New Mexico Junior College

Tbird

Course Descriptions

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Courses are listed below in alphabetical order by general subject and in numerical order within each general subject. The course description contains a short overview of the content of the class.

 
New Mexico General Education Curriculum 
During the 2005 New Mexico Legislative session, Senate Bill 161, consistent with requirements of state law (Chapter 224 of the Laws of New Mexico, 1995 as amended) was signed into law to further enhance and facilitate the articulation of general education courses among New Mexico’s colleges and universities. In accordance with policies established by the New Mexico Higher Education Department, designated general education core courses successfully completed at any regionally accredited public institution of higher education in New Mexico are guaranteed to transfer to any New Mexico public institution. Students who have decided on a major and/or an institution at which to complete their studies should consult with an academic advisor at that particular institution to determine the most appropriate course selections. Students enrolling for the first year of study at a New Mexico college or university and considering possible transfer into a certificate and/or degree program at another institution are encouraged to take the courses approved for transfer during their freshman and sophomore year of study.
 
The New Mexico General Education Core Curriculum includes designated general education courses that are focused on the essential skills that all college graduates need for success and are guaranteed to transfer to any New Mexico public college or university.  Students must complete courses approved for general education by the New Mexico Curriculum & Articulation Committee in the disciplines of communications, mathematics, laboratory science, social and behavioral sciences, humanities, and creative and fine arts. Additional information on the New Mexico Higher Education (HED) General Education Core Model can be found on the NMHED website www.hed.state.nm.us
The current approved NMJC courses are listed below under each of the six General Education Content Areas.
ENGL 1110
Composition I
3 credits
ENGL 1120
Composition II
3 credits
COMM 2120
Interpersonal Communication
3 credits
COMM 1130
Public Speaking
3 credits
MATH 1130
Survey of Mathematics
3 credits
MATH 1220
College Algebra
3 credits
MATH 1230
Trigonometry
3 credits
MATH 1350
Statistics
3 Credits
MATH 1510
Calculus I
3 credits
MATH 1520
Calculus II
3 credits
CHEM 1120C
Introduction of Chemistry (Lecture & Lab)
4 credits
CHEM 1125C
General Chemistry II Lecture & Lab for STEM Majors
4 credits
GEOL 1110C
Physical Geology
4 credits
GEOL 2110C
Historical Geology
4 credits
GEOL 2120C
Introduction to Oceanography
4 credits
GEOL 2130C
Introduction to Meteorology
4 credits
BIOL 1111C
General Biology II
4 credits
BIOL 2210C
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
4 credits
BIOL 2225C
Human Anatomy & Physiology II
4 credits
BIOL 2310C
Microbiology
4 credits
BIOL 2120C
Cellular & Molecular Biology
4 credits
BIOL 2610C
Principles of Biology: Biodiversity, Ecology, & Evolution
4 credits
BIOL 2510
Pathophysiology I
4 credits
BIOL 2520
Pathophysiology II
4 credits
PHYS 1115C
Survey of Physics with Lab
4 credits
PHYS 1131
Technical Physics
4 credits
PHYS 1230C
Algebra-based Physics I
4 credits
PHYS 1240c
Algebra-based Physics II
4 credits
PHYS 1310C
Calculus-based Physics I
4 credits
PHYS 1320C
Calculus-based Physics II
4 credits
ASTR 1115C
Introduction to Astronomy Lecture & Lab
4 credits
CHEM 1215C
General Chemistry I Lecture & Lab for STEM Majors
4 credits
BIOL 1101C
General Biology I for Non-Majors
4 credits
PSYC 1110
Introduction to Psychology
3 credits
PSYC 2140
Child Psychology
3 credits
PSYC 2120
Developmental Psychology
3 credits
PSYC 2390
Educational Psychology
3 credits
PSYC 2130
Adolescent Psychology
3 credits
PSYC 2230
Psychology of Adjustment
3 credits
PSYC 2430
Human Relations
3 credits
SOCI 1110
Introduction to Sociology
3 credits
SOCI 2130
Introduction to Criminology
3 credits
SOCI 2250
Sociology of Race & Ethnicity
3 credits
SOCI 2310
Contemporary Social Problems
3 credits
ENGL 1410
Introduction to Literature
3 credits
ENGL 2210
Professional & Technical Communication
3 credits
ENGL 2310
Introduction to Creative Writing
3 credits
ENGL 2515
Types of Literature II
3 credits
ENGL 2610
American Literature I
3 credits
ENGL 2620
American Literature II
3 credits
ENGL 2630
British Literature I
3 credits
ENGL 2640
British Literature II
3 credits
ENGL 2650
World Literature I
3 credits
ENGL 2660
World Literature II
3 credits
POLS 1120
American National Government
3 credits
GEOG 1120
World Regional Geography
3 credits
HIST 1110
United States History I
3 credits
HIST 1120
United States History II
3 credits
HIST 1150
Western Civilization I
3 credits
HIST 1160
Western Civilization II
3 credits
PHIL 2230
Philosophical Though
3 credits
SPAN 1010
Introduction to Spanish
4 credits
SPAN 1110
Spanish I
4 credits
SPAN 1120
Spanish II
4 credits
SPAN 2210
Spanish III
4 credits
SPAN 2120
Spanish IV
4 credits
ARTS 1320 Ceramics I 3 credits
ARTS 2310 Ceramics II 3 credits
ARTS 1630 Painting I 3 credits
ARTS 2630 Painting II 3 credits
ARTS 1610 Drawing I 3 credits
ARTS 1515 Digital Photography 3 credits
ARTS 2520 Digital Photography II 3 credits
ARTH 1110 Art Appreciation 3 credits
THEA 1110 Introduction to Theatre 3 credits
MUSC 1130 Music Appreciation:  Western Music 3 credits
ARTS 1250 Design II 3 credits
THEA 1220 Beginning Acting

3 credits

Course Descriptions

AC 133                            Accounts Payable
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce best practices for an accounts payable system. Topics included in the course are: invoices, checks, operational use, master vendor files, p-cards, travel and entertainment, regulatory issues, cash management, technology, and communications. This is a three (3) credit hour course. Prerequisite: AC 114 or ACCT 2110, Principles of Accounting I
 

ACCT 2110                      Principles of Accounting I 

4 Credit Hours
An introduction to financial accounting concepts emphasizing the analysis of business transactions in accordance with generally accepted principles (GAAP), the effect of these transactions on the financial statements, financial analysis, and the interrelationships of the financial statements.

ACCT 2115                     Survey of Accounting
3 Credit Hour
This course introduces basic accounting records relating to both merchandising and personal service enterprises. Topics include procedures for handling purchases, sales, cash payments, cash receipts, payroll, petty cash, and preparation of financial statements. Basic computerized accounting procedures are introduced. 


ACCT 2120                      Principles of Accounting II
4 Credit Hours
An introduction to the use of accounting information in the management decision making processes of planning, implementing, and controlling business activities.  In addition, the courses will discuss the accumulation and classification of costs as well demonstrate the difference between costing systems.


ACCT 2125                     Introduction to Intermediate Accounting I
3 Credit Hours
A refinement of the interpretation, recording, and reporting of financial data is introduced in this course. Topics studied will include accounting concepts and principles, underlying assets as reported on the balance sheet, effect on the income statement, and statement of retained earnings.
Prerequisite:  AC 124 or ACCT 2120 Principles of Accounting II

ACCT 2210                     Spreadsheets and Payroll Accounting
3 Credit Hours
This course employs a computerized approach to the accounting environment. The focus will be on Excel and Payroll Accounting. In the Excel environment, numerous applications including book reconciliations, depreciation schedules, accounts receivable, accounts payable, journals, and worksheets will be covered. In the payroll environment, problems concerning unemployment law, fair employment law, human resource systems, social security, and income tax withholding will be solved using software provided.  This is designed for students with limited or not background in computers.
Prerequisites:  AC 114 or ACCT 2110 Principles of Accounting I & AC 113 or ACCT 2115 Introduction to Accounting

ACCT 2130                      Introduction to Intermediate Accounting II (Spring 2021)
3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation and refinement of the interpretation, recording, and reporting of financial data. Topics studied include accounting concepts and principles underlying liabilities and stockholder’s equity as reported on the balance sheet, effect on the income statement, and statement of retained earnings.
Prerequisite:  AC 213 or ACCT 2125 Intermediate Accounting I

ACCT 2220                     Computerized Accounting
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover a complex computerized accounting system utilizing QuickBooks Accountant software. This course will include the general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, inventory, payroll, and depreciation.
Prerequisite: AC 124 or ACCT 2125 Principles of Accounting II

ACCT 2320                     Introduction to Tax I (Individual)
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed as a first course in Federal Taxation for undergraduate accounting, business, and law students. The primary focus of this course is individual taxation including gross income, personal and dependency exemptions, filing status, deductions and losses, capital recovery, itemized deductions, alternative minimum tax, and tax credits. Students will solve tax problems utilizing computerized tax software as though they were actually filing tax returns.
Prerequisite:  AC 114 or ACCT 2110 Principles of Accounting I
 

ACCT 2998 A-C                     Accounting Internship 

Variable Credit Hours: 1, 2, 3
Accounting Cooperative Work Experience is designed to improve accounting theoretical skills through actual work experience. Work objectives will be established and completed on a semester basis with the cooperative employer and the accounting coordinator/instructor.
Prerequisite:  AC 124 or ACCT 2120 Principles of Accounting II

AG 111                             Careers in Agriculture
1 Credit Hours
Introduction to scientific disciplines and career options in animal science and agriculture industry.  Focus will be on the skill development including resume preparation, networking, importance of internships, and leadership and leadership experiences in animal agriculture.

AG 123C                          Computers in Agriculture
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to introduce students to computer applications as well as graphical and electronic information technology as it relates to the agriculture industry. Students will be able to utilize computers and related technology in record-keeping, agricultural production, agribusiness and telecommunications.

AG 213A                          Agribusiness Management
3 Credit Hours
This course covers many of the areas of expertise that today's managers must master including finance, marketing, operations, forms of business ownership, organizational management, and human resources. This course pays special attention to the distinct challenges faced by managers in the food and agribusiness system.
AN 123                            Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3 Credit Hours
This course is a brief history of the growth of the sciences of anthropology and archaeology. It examines in a holistic approach, the aspects of culture including technology, ecology, economics, family structure, political structure, religion, linguistics, the arts, and education.

ANSC 103                         Equine Science
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to introduce students to the history, breeds, anatomy, selection, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, and management of the horse.

ANSC 113                         Introduction to Veterinary Science
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introductory course in veterinary science. It will cover basic information about animal health, handling, nutrition, reproduction, genetics, facilities, maintenance, anatomy and physiology, and business management.

ANSC 114                         Introduction to Animal Science
4 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the livestock industry and provides a survey of modern animal science. It will include application of physiology, meat science, genetics, endocrinology, and nutrition as well as breeding selection, feeding, and management of farm animals. Areas covered include sheep, swine, cattle, and horses.
Concurrent enrollment in ANSC 114L (laboratory) is required.

ANSC 203                         Animal Metabolism & Nutrition
3 Credit Hours
This course will explore the mechanisms of animal metabolism and nutrition as they relate to production, maintenance, performance, and health of animals. 

ANSC 213                         Meat Science
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover the fundamental aspects of the red meat industry.  Lecture topics will include the nutrient value of the meat, meat preservation, meat safety, muscle structure and contraction, slaughter and processing of beef, lamb, and pork, sausage manufacture, meat cutting, meat cooker, and muscle and bone anatomy.  Several field trips maybe included with this course

ANSC 214                         Farm Animal A&P
4 Credit Hours
This course will cover structure and function of the animal body. It will include studies of the horse, cow, sheep, and pig. It will make comparisons to the human body and have application to real life animal husbandry.

ANSC 223                         Introduction to Genetics
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to genetics and inheritance relative livestock production and the use of performance information in livestock improvement programs. Covers fundamental principles of reproduction, variation, and heredity in plants and animals.
ARTH 1110                       Art Appreciation
3 Credit Hours
This is a general course on art appreciation. Open to all college students; it covers the analysis of art elements and principles as applied to various forms of visual expression including painting, drawing, sculpture, and architecture. This course will develop for the student awareness and appreciation of art through film and video, presentations, classroom assignments, and active student participation in class discussions.  
 
ARTS 1320                        Ceramics I
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the medium of clay as a material. Instruction in various hand forming techniques and wheel throwing will be provided. Emphasis will be on the aesthetics of sculptural statements in clay and the importance of the utilitarian aspects of clay. Students will be exposed to the numerous firing techniques possible in the ceramic discipline. 
 
ARTS 1515                       Digital Photography
3 Credit Hours
This is a beginning course in digital photography and assumes no prior knowledge of digital camera usage or manipulation of digital images. Emphasis is on digital camera skills and image editing software using a computer.
ARTS 1610                        Drawing I
3 Credit Hours
Through varied media, props, and still life arrangements, the student will explore the elements of line, shape, texture, value, and space. Major areas of focus include basic rendering techniques and skills formation, which includes perceptual and aesthetic development.
 
ARTS1630                          Painting I
3 Credit Hours
This introductory course in painting focuses on teaching the student a solid foundation in color theory, mixing, the application of pigment and mediums, canvas preparation, basic painting skills, and aesthetic sensibilities. It will include regular outside assignments.
ARTS 2520                        Digital Photography II
3 Credit Hours
Techniques and concepts learned in Digital Photography I are expanded upon in this project-oriented course.  Predictable image capture, enhanced color management archival printing techniques and presentation of work to professional portfolio standard.
Prerequisite: AR 113D or ARTS 1515 Digital Photography or permission of the instructor
 
ARTS 2310                        Ceramics II
3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of AR 213B Ceramics I with greater emphasis on individual maturation within the ceramic discipline.
Prerequisite: AR213B or ARTS 1320 Ceramics I or permission of the instructor.
ARTS 2630                        Painting II
3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation in skills formation, technique, and expressive development studied in Painting I. The student will be encouraged to develop paintings that focus on a personal area of interest while applying the concepts presented in class.
Prerequisite: AR 213A or ARTS 1630 Painting I 

AR 191-296 (A-Z)            Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester. 
ASTR 1115C                     Introduction to Astronomy 
4 Credit Hours 
The observations, theories, and methods of astronomy in relation to the major areas of astronomy (Planetary, Solar, Stellar, and Galactic) will be covered in this course. This is a course intended for non-science majors.  Concurrent enrollment in ASTR 1115Z (laboratory) is required.
AT 113                               Engine Repair
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover the fundamentals of automotive engine operation, the service and repair of automotive engines, and the diagnosis and overhaul procedures related to these engines. 

AT 114                               Basic Diesel Engine Operations
4 Credit Hours
The design, operation, maintenance, diagnosis, and repair of diesel engines are covered in this course. The instruction provided in this course focuses on diesel engine systems that influence engine performance and drivability. Areas of instruction include the diagnosis and repair of base engine systems, fuel systems, electrical systems, induction systems, and diesel electronic engine control systems.  

AT 114A                            Cooperative Work Experience I
4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of AT 113, AT 124C, and AT 124D and includes work experience in a cooperating automotive service facility. Students will work as trainees under the supervision of an experienced automotive technician. Open to Automotive Technology students only. Minimum of twenty hours of work per week are required.

AT 114B                            Cooperative Work Experience II
4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of AT 213A, AT 213C, and AT 223B and includes work experience in a cooperating automotive service facility. Students will work as trainees under the supervision of an experienced automotive technician. Open to Automotive Technology students only. Minimum of twenty hours of work per week are required.

AT 123                               Basic Electronics
3 credit hours
This course covers automotive electrical and electronic systems. Areas of instruction include general electrical system diagnosis and repair, battery diagnosis and service, starting and charging system diagnosis and repair, lighting systems, gauges, warning devices, horns, wiper/washers and power operated accessories. Open to Automotive Technology students only.

AT 123C                            Brake Systems
3 Credit Hours
This course covers the operating principles, service, and troubleshooting procedures of automotive brake systems. Open to Automotive Technology students only. 

AT 124A                            Engine Performance
4 Credit Hours
This course covers automotive systems related to engine performance and drivability. Areas of instruction include ignition systems, fuel systems, and computerized engine controls, drivability diagnosis, exhaust emission controls, and scan data diagnosis. Open to Automotive Technology students only. 
 
AT 124B                            Advanced Electronics
This is the second of two courses providing instruction on the electrical and electronic systems. This course focuses primarily on automotive electronics and microcomputer-based systems. Areas of instruction include safety, multiplexing related diagnosis and repair, microprocessor operation, sensors, actuators, electronic automotive systems and various electrical accessory systems not covered in Electronics I. This is a four credit hour course. Prerequisite:  AT 123 Basic Electronics
 
AT 134C                            Advanced Brake Systems

This course builds on material presented in the Basic Brakes course and is designed to provide an advanced understanding of brake systems correction. Advanced automotive brake system concepts, including theory and practical application related to antilock braking systems, mechanical brake systems, hydraulics, precision measure instruments, and how to use diagnostic test equipment. This is a four credit hour course.  Prerequisite:  AT 124C Basic Brakes

AT 143                            Technical Math for the Auto Industry
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed for the student majoring in a vocational / technical field. It includes a brief review of whole numbers, decimals, and fractions followed by fundamental operations of algebra, linear equations, ratio, proportions, variations, percent, basic geometry, unit conversions, metric system, and applications in the technical fields.

AT 191-296 (A-Z)           Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

AT 212                             Cooperative Work Experience III
2 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of AT 114A and AT 114B and includes work experience in a cooperating automotive service facility. Students will work as trainees under the supervision of an experienced automotive technician. Open to Automotive Technology students only. Minimum of twenty hour of work per week is required.

AT 213A                          Manual Drive Trains and Axles
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover the operation, service, and repair of manual drive and axle systems. Areas of instruction include clutch systems, manual transmissions, manual transaxles, front wheel drive axle shafts, CV joints, rear wheel drive universal joints, drive shafts, rear axles, and four-wheel drive units. Open to Automotive Technology students only.

AT 213B                          Heating and Air Conditioning Systems
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover the operation, diagnosis, service and repair of automotive heating and air conditioning systems. Open to Automotive Technology students only.

AT 213C                          Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover the operation, service and repair of automatic transmissions and transaxles. Also covered will be the diagnosis and overhaul procedures. Open to Automotive technology students only.

AT 223B                          Suspension and Steering Systems
3 Credit Hours
This course covers the operation, diagnosis, service, and repair of suspension and steering systems. Areas of instruction include front and rear suspension, wheels, tires and steering. Open to Automotive Technology students only.

AT 223C                          Automotive Service Management
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to automotive service management.  Areas of instruction include an overview of the automotive service industry, the role of the automotive service manager, controlling service operations, management techniques, and management and business ethics. 
FM 113                             Technology for Technicians
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the computer technology skills required of automotive technicians. Areas of instruction include basic computer operations, the installation and use of software, navigation of Windows and related applications, the use of electronic service information, the use of PC-based diagnostic equipment, programming diagnostic devices, and the reprogramming of vehicle on-board computers. Also included is instruction in the sending and receiving of electronic mail (e-mail), and basic Internet applications.

FM 114                               Automotive Fundamentals
4 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the servicing of Ford Motor Company vehicles. Areas of instruction include the selection and use of Ford service publications, the interpretation of VIN Codes, body styles and car lines, repair order processing, the safe and correct use of hand tools, and precision measuring instruments and equipment. Specific on-vehicle instruction for pre-delivery operations, campaign procedures, basic service operations for wind noise and water leaks, and engine cooling and lubrication systems are also covered. Open to Ford ASSET students only.

FM 114A                           Cooperative Work Experience I
4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of FM 114 and FM 124 and includes work experience in a cooperating Ford-Lincoln-Mercury dealership. Student will work as a trainee under the supervision of an experienced Ford automotive technician. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 

FM 114B                           Cooperative Work Experience II
4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of FM 124A and FM 124B and includes work experience in a cooperating Ford-Lincoln-Mercury dealership is required. Student will work as a trainee under the supervision of an experienced Ford automotive technician. Open to Ford ASSET students only.

FM 114C                           Cooperative Work Experience III
4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of FM 124C and FM 214A and includes work experience in a cooperating Ford-Lincoln-Mercury dealership. Student will work as a trainee under the supervision of an experienced Ford automotive technician. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 

FM 124                              Electronics I
4 Credit Hours
This is the first of two courses providing instruction on the electrical and electronic systems used on Ford Motor Company cars and light trucks sold in North America. Areas of instruction include safety, electrical and electronic fundamentals, analog and digital test equipment, basic circuit diagnosis, interpretation and use of wiring diagrams and service manuals, and component operation. Also included are general electrical system diagnosis and repair along with focused diagnosis, maintenance, and repair of the battery, starting, and charging systems. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 

FM 124A                           Engine Performance I
4 Credit Hours
This is the first of three courses providing instruction in Ford Motor Company vehicle systems that influence engine performance and drivability. Areas of instruction include related safety, gasoline engine operation and performance, ignition systems, fuel systems, induction systems, vacuum control systems and vacuum/mechanical emission control systems. The major emphasis of this course is to provide a solid foundation for later in-depth instruction in Electronic Engine Control systems. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 
Prerequisite:  FM 124B Electronics II

FM 124B                           Electronics II
4 Credit HoursThis is the second of three courses providing instruction on the electrical and electronic systems used on Ford Motor Company vehicles. This course focuses primarily on automotive electronics and microcomputer-based systems. Areas of instruction include safety, multiplexing related diagnosis and repair, microprocessor operation, sensors, actuators, electronic automotive systems and various electrical accessory systems not covered in Electronics I. Open to Ford ASSET students only.
Prerequisites:  FM 114 Automotive Fundamentals and FM 124 Electronics I 

FM 124C                           Brake Systems
4 Credit HoursThis course covers the operating principles, service, and troubleshooting procedures of Ford Motor Company’s brake systems. Areas of instruction include safety and the operational principles, repair, maintenance, and diagnostic procedures for wheel bearings, brake hydraulics, drum brakes, disc brakes, power assist, traction assist, anti-lock brake systems, and vehicle stability control systems. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 
Prerequisite:  FM 124B Electronics II 

FM 124D                           Diesel Engine Operations
4 Credit Hours
The design, operation, maintenance, diagnosis, and repair of diesel engines used in Ford Motor Company vehicles are covered in this course. The instruction provided in this course focuses on diesel engine systems that influence engine performance and drivability. Areas of instruction include the diagnosis and repair of base engine systems, fuel systems, electrical systems, induction systems, and diesel electronic engine control systems. Open to Ford ASSET students only.
Prerequisite:  FM 124B Electronics II

FM 124E                            Electronics III
4 Credit Hours
This course provides instruction on the electrical and electronic systems used on Ford Motor Company vehicles. The course focuses primarily on automotive electronics and microcomputer-based systems. Areas of instruction include body control and communication systems, Ford SYNC System, entertainment systems, Ford supplemental restraint systems, Ford security systems, accident avoidance systems, and parking assistance systems.
Prerequisite: FM 114 Automotive Fundamentals, FM 124 Electronics I, and FM 124B Electronics II

FM 211                               Noise, Vibration, and Harshness
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to develop a systematic approach to diagnosing and correcting noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH) concerns. Instruction will focus on the use of the Ford electronic vibration analyzer, and the Chassis Ears. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 
Prerequisite:  FM 124B Electronics II

FM 214                               Engine Repair
4 Credit Hours
This course will review the fundamentals of automotive engine operation and cover the service and repair of Ford Motor Company’s automotive engines. The diagnosis and overhaul procedures related to these engines is also covered. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 
Prerequisite:  FM 114 Automotive Fundamentals

FM 214A                           Manual Drive Train and Axles
4 Credit Hours
This course will cover the operation, service, and repair of Ford Motor Company’s manual drive train and axle systems. Areas of instruction include the diagnosis and overhaul of Ford clutch systems, manual transmissions, manual transaxles, front wheel drive axle shafts and CV joints, rear wheel drive universal joints and drive shafts, and rear axles and four-wheel drive units. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 
Prerequisite:  FM 124B Electronics II

FM 214B                           Heating and Air Conditioning
4 Credit Hours
This course will cover the operation, diagnosis, service, and repair of Ford Motor Company’s heating and air conditioning systems. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 
Prerequisite:  FM 124B Electronics II

FM 214C                           Automatic Transmissions and Transaxles
4 Credit Hours
This course will cover the operation, service, and repair of Ford Motor Company’s automatic transmissions and transaxles. Also covered will be the diagnosis and overhaul of electronic controlled automatic transmissions and transaxles. Open to Ford ASSET students only. 
Prerequisite:  FM 124B Electronics II

FM 224                               Engine Performance Operation & Diagnosis
4 Credit Hours
This is a comprehensive course covering the systems and factors affecting engine performance and drivability. Areas of instruction include related safety, the influence of engine design on performance and emissions, advanced ignition systems diagnosis, advanced Electronic Engine Control (EEC), OBDII, drivability diagnosis, exhaust emission controls, and Ford fuel injection system service, repair, and PC-based diagnostics.  Open to Ford ASSET students only.
Prerequisite: FM 124B Electronics II and FM 124E Electronics III

FM 224A                          Cooperative Work Experience IV
4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of FM 211, FM 212, FM 214, and FM 224 and includes work experience in a cooperating Ford-Lincoln-Mercury dealership. Student will work as a trainee under the supervision of an experienced Ford automotive technician. Open to Ford ASSET students only.

FM 224B                          Suspension and Steering Systems
4 Credit Hours
This course covers the operation, diagnosis, service, and repair of Ford Motor Company’s suspension and steering systems. Areas of instruction include front and rear suspension, wheel, tires, steering, wheel alignment, and associated hydraulic and electronic management systems. Open to Ford ASSET students only.
Prerequisite:  FM 124B Electronics II.

FM 224C                          Cooperative Work Experience V
4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of FM 214B, FM 214C, and FM 224B and includes work experience in a cooperating Ford-Lincoln-Mercury dealership. Student will work as a trainee under the supervision of an experienced Ford automotive technician.

FM 234                            Advanced Drivability and Diagnostics
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to develop and apply vehicle drivability related diagnostic skills, concentrating on both gasoline and diesel engine systems. The diagnostic strategies used will include the interpretation of recorded data. In addition, this course covers emission system inspection and emission system efficiency testing procedures. In this course students will use appropriate equipment to diagnose vehicles with multiple faults, intermittent concerns, and no-code concerns related to base engine, electronic engine control, ignition, emission, fuel, and air inlet systems. Open to Ford ASSET students only.  Prerequisites:  FM 124B, FM 224, and FM 124D
BIOL 1101C                    General Biology I
4 Credit Hours
General Biology I stresses the concepts, characteristics, and diversities of life. Emphasis is placed upon the scientific method, the chemistry of living organisms, cell structure and function, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, cell reproduction, inheritance, molecular genetics, and evolution.  Concurrent enrollment in BI 114L or BIOL 1101Z (laboratory) is required.

BIOL 1111C                     General Biology II
4 Credit Hours
General Biology II stresses the origins of life, the diversity of viruses, bacteria, protists, and fungi; the diversity of plants, plant structure and function; animal diversity, animal structure and function; as well as animal behavior, ecology of populations, ecosystems, and environmental concerns. Concurrent enrollment in BI 124L or BIOL 1111Z (laboratory) is required.

BIOL 2120C                      Cellular & Molecular Biology
4 Credit Hours
This course provides a background for students majoring in science or entering into health care fields such as pre-dentistry, pre-medicine, or pre-pharmacy. It will emphasize scientific inquiry into the basic biochemistry of living cells, cellular structures and functions, processes of photosynthesis and cellular respiration, cell cycle, molecular genetics, and gene regulation. Concurrent enrollment in BI 134L or BIOL 2120Z (laboratory) is required.

BIOL 2210C                      Human Anatomy and Physiology I
4 Credit Hours
This course is the first of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on anatomic, directional, and sectional terminology, basic cellular structure and metabolism, tissue differentiation and characteristics, and organ system structure and function; Specifically the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2210Z (laboratory) is required. (Previously BI 214A) Prerequisite: College level biology course (BI 114, 124, 134, 144, or 224, or BIOL 1101C, 1111C, 2120C, 2610C, or 2310C)
 
BIOL 2225C                      Human Anatomy and Physiology II
4 Credit Hours
This course is the second of two that serve as an introduction to human anatomy and physiology for biology majors and allied health students. The course entails describing, explaining, and analyzing structure and function from the submicroscopic to the organismal level with emphasis on specific cellular, tissue, and organ structure and physiology, and organ system structure and function; specifically the endocrine, cardiovascular, respiratory, urinary, and reproductive systems. Additionally, an analysis of these concepts is included: fluid and electrolyte balance, pregnancy, growth and development from zygote to newborn, and heredity. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2225Z (laboratory) is required. (Previously BI 224A) Prerequisite: BI 214A or BIOL 2210C Human Anatomy & Physiology I, or consent of the instructor

BIOL 2310C                      Microbiology
4 Credit Hours
Introduction to the basic principles of microbiology, microbial pathogenesis, host defenses and infectious diseases. The course will emphasize concepts related to the structure and function of microorganisms, including their mechanisms of metabolism and growth. Host parasite interactions will also be emphasized, including mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis and mechanisms of host defenses against infectious diseases. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2310Z (laboratory) is required. (Previously BI 224) Prerequisites:  College level biology (BI 114, 124, 134, 144, or 214, or BIOL 1101C, 1111C, 2120C, 2610C, or 2210C)

BIOL 2510                        Pathophysiology I
3 Credit Hours               
This course focuses on the pathophysiology of cellular adaptation, injury and repair. Thereafter, the course focuses on the pathophysiology of anemia, neoplasms and white blood cell malignancies, brain and nervous system diseases, special senses, musculoskeletal system and joint diseases, and integumentary diseases. Immune defenses against infectious diseases and immunologic diseases are also covered. In addition, the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and other clinical considerations of diseases in these systems will be discussed. (Previously NU 103) Prerequisite:  BI 214A Anatomy and Physiology I


BIOL 2520                       Pathophysiology II
3 Credit Hours              
Pathophysiology II builds on the concepts studied in Pathophysiology I. This course will focus on the molecular and cellular basis of diseases of the cardiovascular, clotting and coagulation, respiratory, gastrointestinal, urinary and endocrine systems. In addition, the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations and other clinical considerations of diseases in these systems will be discussed. (Previously NU 103A) Prerequisite:  BI 224A Anatomy and Physiology II, NU 103 Pathophysiology I

BIOL 2610C                      Principles of Biology: Biodiversity/Ecology/Evolution
4 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the dynamic processes of living things. Major topics include the mechanisms of evolution, biological diversity, population genetics, and ecology. Concurrent enrollment in BIOL 2610Z (laboratory) is required. (Previously BI 144)
 
BI 191-296 (A-Z)              Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

BU 111C, 112C, 113C     Cooperative Work Experience in Management
1-3 Credit Hours
This course will consist of work experience in a business environment while applying concepts learned in the classroom. Work objectives will be established and completed on a semester basis with a cooperative employer and the management coordinator / instructor. This is a variable credit hour course ranging from one to three credit hours.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: BU 213, AC 114, BU 223, CS 123D
 

BU 113E                            Business English
3 Credit Hours
This course will focus on an intensive study of grammar, punctuation, and word usage necessary for success in the business world.  

BU 123B                            Records Management
3 Credit Hours
This is a beginning course designed to cover the principles and procedures used in the selection and operation of both physical and computer filing systems.
 
BU 123C                            Office Procedures
3 Credit Hours
This is a capstone course for running a business office. It is a culmination of the skills learned throughout the program with additional training and procedures.
Prerequisite: BU 113E Business English  

BU 213G                            Supervision
3 Credit Hours
This course examines the role of supervisory management and its importance to the over-all success of any organization.

 

BU 223B                             Human Resource Management
3 Credit Hours
This course examines the methods of recruitment, selection, placement, motivation, and evaluation in human resource management. It also covers employment law, employee benefits, and compensation.

BU 223C                              Small Business Management
3 Credit Hours
This course covers the principles of successful business. Topics included are how to start and maintain a small business, cash and asset management, management of account receivables, gross margin return on investment analysis, the legal environment, and developing a pricing strategy. Calculations and assignments are to be done with the computer; electronic spreadsheet—no computer class required.
 
BU 223D                             Entrepreneurship
3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on new business design and skill development. Students will complete a market research and feasibility assessment and use this information to develop a business plan. Emphasis is on writing the vision and mission statements, the company overview, the product / service strategy, the marketing plan, the financial plan, and the executive summary.
 
BU 243                                Business and Professional Communication
3 Credit Hours
This course develops the interpersonal, small group, and public communication skills most useful in business relationships and professional organizations. 
 

BU 191-296 (A-Z)            Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

BFIN 2110                         Introduction to Finance
3 Credit Hours
Introduces tools and techniques of financial management. Includes time value of money; financial planning, diversification and risk; debt and equity investment decisions; and financial statement analysis. 
 
BFIN 2140                         Personal Finance
3 Credit Hours
This course includes an investigation of the financial problems individuals and families face: budgeting, taxes, credit, insurance, investments, planning for the purchase of a home, planning for retirement, etc., and the development of analytical techniques and skills to use in dealing with these problems. 
 
BLAW 2110                     Business Law I
3 Credit Hours
Survey of the legal environment of business and common legal principles including: the sources of law, dispute resolution and the U.S. court systems, administrative law, tort law, contract law, agency and employment law, business structure and governance, ethics and corporate social responsibility. Explores sources of liability and presents strategies to minimize legal risk.
 
BLAW 2120                     Business Law II
3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of the study of the principles of law emphasizing property commercial paper, secured transactions, creditors’ rights, insurance, agency, employment, business organizations, real property, and estates. 
 
BUSA 1110                        Introduction to Business
3 Credit Hours
Introduction to the fundamental concepts and terminology of business including areas such as management, marketing, accounting, economics, personnel, and finance; and the global environment in which they operate. 

 

BUSA 2110                          Business Communications
3 Credit Hours
This course covers the business communication environment.  It includes business writing, business styles, business memos, short and long reports, job search and resume writing, oral business presentations, communication for intercultural business, and business ethics.   

 

BUSA 2180                           Introduction to E-Commerce 

3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the set up, organization, and operation of an online business. Basic concepts for operating an online business including e-commerce business models, marketing, security, store operations, order processing, and website design are introduced.

BUSA 2460                         Business Ethics 
3 Credit Hours
This course educates students on the impact ethical issues play in the use of information technology in the modern business world and will present key points that must be considered when making a business decision. Prerequisites: CS 123D Computer Applications

 
MGMT 2110                      Principles of Management
3 Credit Hours
An introduction to the basic theory of management including the functions of planning, organizing, staffing, leading, and controlling; while considering management's ethical and social responsibilities. 

MKTG 2110                          Principles of Marketing
3 Credit Hours
Survey of modern marketing concepts and practices focusing on the marketing mix: product, pricing, promotion, and distribution strategies. Topics include; the marketing environment, consumer behavior, marketing research, target marketing, and the ethical and social responsibilities of marketers. 
 
 
CHEM 1120C                     Introduction to Chemistry
4 Credit Hours
Fundamental chemical concepts, properties of substances, chemical bonding, energy, acids, bases, and nuclear energy are some of the major topics covered in this course. Topics are discussed with current applications. The course is intended for non-science majors only. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1120Z (laboratory) is required. 

CHEM 1215C                    General Chemistry I 
4 Credit Hours 
General chemistry is a comprehensive study of chemical behavior of matter. The study of atomic theory, chemical bonding, elemental periodicity, nomenclature, and physical properties in relation to structure are the major topics covered in this course. The course is designed for pre-professional and science majors. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1215Z (laboratory) is required.

CHEM 1225C                    General Chemistry II
4 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of CH 114A. Major topics include solutions, equilibrium, elementary thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, acids-bases, and electrochemistry.   The course is designed for pre-professional and science majors. Concurrent enrollment in CH 124AL (laboratory) is required. Prerequisite: CH 114A or CHEM 1225Z General Chemistry I
 
CH 191-296 (A-Z)              Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
BCIS 1110                          Fundamentals of Information Literacy & Systems 

3 Credit Hours
This course examines information systems and their impact on commerce, education, and personal activities by the utilization of productivity tools for communications, data analysis, information management and decision-making. The course will utilize the following productivity tools: word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. The course assumes the student has basic computer skills. 

CS 103                                 Introduction to CIS
3 Credit Hours
This course provides an introduction to Computer Information Systems. Topics include the history of computers, current computer technology and terminology, the Internet, software, systems, and societal issues related to computer use.  (Laboratory – 2 Hours) Prerequisite: CS 123D

CS 103A                              Keyboarding & Document Processing I
3 Credit Hours
This is an introductory keyboarding course that utilizes a popular word processing software. The course is designed to help the student learn the alphabetic and numeric keys; to develop proper keyboarding techniques; to build basic speed and accuracy skills, and to provide practice in applying those basic skills to the formatting of letters, tables, reports, memorandums, and many other kinds of personal and business documents.

CS 103B                             Keyboarding & Document Processing II
3 Credit Hours
This course is taught on computers and utilizes popular word-processing software. It promotes the further development of basic keyboarding skills and emphasizes the production of a wide range of typical business correspondence, tables, reports, and forms. Emphasis is also placed on improving typing speed and accuracy.
Prerequisite: CS 103A Keyboarding & Document Processing I

CS 113A                             Basic Computers
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to teach students how to operate a computer. It assumes the student does not have basic computer skills. (Laboratory – 2 Hours) 

CS 113C                              Internet Access Basics
3 Credit Hours
This course covers browser basics, communications, searches, resources, downloading, and storing data. It will also cover user-generated content, security issues, and creating web pages. Prerequisite: CS 123D Computer Applications 

CS 113F                               Introduction to Word Processing
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of word processing, including creating business documents, working with graphics and tables, and designing macros. The student should gain extensive hands-on experience in each facet of the application.

CS 114                                 Fundamentals of Programming
4 Credit Hours
This course provides a guide to developing structured program logic. The course assumes no programming experience and does not focus on any one particular language. It introduces programming concepts and enforces good style and logical thinking.
Prerequisite: Student must have completed TS 113E Basic Math equivalent or higher.

CS 114B                              Introduction to Databases
4 Credit Hours
This course provides students with the necessary training to develop database applications. Students will have the opportunity to learn techniques for managing large amounts of data and provide sorts, queries, and reports to guide decision making in a variety of settings. The focus of this course is to explore and exercise the purpose and functions within a database and use the data to maximize business operations.

CS 123C                             Introduction to Web Development
3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the fundamentals of web technologies. Students will learn how to design and publish webpages utilizing current web programming languages.
Prerequisite: CS 123D Computer Applications

CS 123G                             Advanced Computer Applications
3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of Computer Applications. This course will include advanced concepts in word processing spreadsheets, databases, and presentation graphics. (Laboratory – 2 Hours)  Prerequisite: CS 123D Computer Applications


CS 213C                            Visual BASIC Programming
3 Credit Hours
This course provides an introduction to object oriented, event driven business application programming and graphical user interfaces in the windows environment. This course is designed to focus on the fundamental concepts of computer programming. Students will be taught the program development cycle and general problem-solving techniques.
Prerequisites: Student must be eligible to enroll in MA 113 or have the consent of instructor.
Prior enrollment in CS 113 is recommended.

CS 214V                            Introduction to Virtualization
4 Credit Hours
Virtualization is an increasingly popular solution for organizations of diverse sizes. IT professionals are required to understand, design, and implement virtualization solutions to provide agile, flexible, and cost-effective computing resources to organizations. This course introduces students to virtualization technologies and identifies business benefits, reasons to adopt virtualization, and concerns or challenges of virtualization. This course is suitable for students who would like to gain practical knowledge on system virtualization and will allow students to gain hands-on experiences with common hosted and bare metal hypervisors.

CS 214J                                Java Programming
3 Credit Hours
This course provides students with a comprehensive knowledge and hands-on experience with the Java programming environment and features. Students will design, write, debug, and run Java stand-alone programs and Java applets. Topics covered include Java language syntax, elements, operators, statements, arrays, string manipulation classes, graphics, graphical user interface, common classes, and basic I/O operations.
Prerequisite: CS 113 or experience/knowledge of a programming language.

CS 214N                             Networking Basics
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to provide the knowledge and skills needed to install, configure, and maintain a network for a small business as well as prepare students for networking certifications including Test-Out Network Pro and Comp TIA Network+.

CS 223E                              Advanced Web Development
3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of CS 123C Introduction to Web Development. The main focus of study is on advanced web development technologies.  
Prerequisite: CS 123C Introduction to Web Development.

CS 223S                              Introduction to Operating Systems
3 Credit Hours
This course provides a comprehensive overview of the multiple operating systems commonly found in the Information Technology field.
Prerequisites: CS 214N Networking Basics

CS 224                                 Introduction to Spreadsheets
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to give students a thorough understanding of spreadsheets and prepares students for the MOS: Microsoft Office Excel Expert certification exam. The student should gain extensive hands-on experience in each facet of the application.

CS 224A                             Ethical Hacking
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to give students the skill set to move into the cybersecurity field. The course covers the five phases of ethical hacking: reconnaissance, scanning, gaining access, and maintaining access. This course prepares students for the TestOut Ethical Hacker Pro exam and EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker exam.

CS 224M                            Computer Repair & Upgrade I
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to develop skills in regards to routine preventive maintenance of PC’s hardware and software troubleshooting, motherboard testing, adding replacement boards and peripherals, and upgrading the central processing unit.  Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be prepared to attempt to take the A+ certification exam.

CS 224N                             Server Network
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to expose students to tasks and skills necessary to implement, troubleshoot, repair, and maintain interconnecting network devices. In covering the material, this course should help prepare students for certifications.
Prerequisite: CS 214N Networking Basics

CS 233S                              Systems Architecture
3 Credit Hours
This course provides detailed information of computer hardware and system software. The material covered in this course is intended to form a foundation of technical knowledge for systems analysis, design, configuration, procurement, and management.

CS 234M                            Computer Repair & Upgrade II
4 Credit Hours
This course is part II of the Computer Repair and Upgrade course. It is designed to acquire the knowledge and develop the fundamental skills to install, repair, upgrade, configure, troubleshoot, improve, perform basic computer networking, and preventive maintenance of PC's hardware and software. Upon successful completion of both Computer Repair and Upgrade I and II courses, the student will be prepared to attempt to take the Test-Out and Comp TIA A+ certification exams.

CS 234N                             Advance Server Network
4 Credit Hours
This course prepares students for the Server Pro: Manage and Administer Certification by exposing students to Active Directory management, Group Policy configuration, file services management, DNS configuration, routing and remote access configuration, and deployment management.
Prerequisite: CS 214N Networking Basics

CS 244N                             Network Security
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to prepare students for the Security Pro Certification, by introducing basic security concepts, terminology, and issues, along with the practical skills essential to security. Prerequisite: CS 214N Networking Basics

 

CS 191-296 (A-Z)        Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
NOTE: The following courses are taught through the Corrections Academy. These courses will substitute for the criminal justice courses (CJ) as indicated when applying for the Associate of Arts or Associates of Applied Science degrees. However, the criminal justice courses (CJ) will not substitute for the corrections academy courses (CA), since the CA courses have additional components not in the CJ courses to meet the requirements for licensure by the state of New Mexico as a correctional officer.
 
CA 111X                           Physical Training and Wellness for Corrections Officers
1 Credit Hour
This course is designed to enhance the basic correction officer’s level of fitness, as well as develop an understanding of wellness as it relates to corrections. This class will include demonstration, discussion, and participation. Periodic fitness assessments and strength, cardiovascular, and flexibility training will be incorporated into this class. Additionally, concepts covering nutrition and safety will be covered. The student will be required to perform satisfactorily on the final fitness tests and agility courses for state certification as a corrections officer. Co-requisite: Enrollment in the Corrections Academy.
CA  113J                            Introduction to Corrections (same as CJ 113J)
3 Credit Hours
This introductory course is designed to acquaint individuals with the role of corrections in America. It is an examination of the broad spectrum of systems, processes and people that constitute the field of corrections.  Whenever possible, practical orientation to the field of corrections will be explored.
CA 123J                             Corrections Officer Safety and Weapons Training (same as CJ 123J)
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover basic shooting principles used by correctional officer and will include instruction in nomenclature, handling, loading and firing of the service revolver, rifle, shotgun, and 37 mm gas gun.  Lawful use of chemical agents including identification, coding, delivery, and decontamination procedures will be covered.
CA 133J                             Communication and Interpersonal Skills for the Correction Officer
3 Credit Hours
This course examines the interpersonal skills needed by corrections officials to understand and effectively interact with the incarcerated society. Community relations and courtesies are addressed with emphasis given to communication with the convicted offender. Report writing instruction will include interviews, statement taking, note taking and final reports.  Radio and telephone communication will include practical exercises as appropriate.
BARB 1100                   Barbering Level 1
9 Credit Hours
This course includes basic hair styling, shaving, facials, permanent waving, scalp treatments, hair cutting, tinting, and bleaching. Additional topics applicable to barbering are also covered. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a barber. This is the first of four consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School 135 hours of lecture and 185 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: 10th grade education or equivalent.
 
BARB 1120                   Barbering Level 2
9 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Level 2 segment requiring basic shaving, hairstyling, facials, permanent waving, scalp treatments, hair cutting, tinting, bleaching, soft permanent wave, and ammonium thioglycolate and sodium hydroxide chemical relaxing. Additional topics applicable to cosmetology are also covered. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a barber. This is the second of four consecutive segments.Pivot Point Member School. 135 hours of lecture and 185 laboratory hours.
Prerequisite: BARB 1100 (Level 1) with a grade of "C" or better
 
BARB 1200                   Barbering Level 3
9 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Level 3 segment requiring shaving, hair styling, facials, scalp and hair treatments, hair cutting, tinting, bleaching, soft permanent wave, and ammonium thioglycolate and sodium hydroxide chemical relaxing. Additional topics applicable to barbering are also covered. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a barber. This is the third of four consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School. 99 hours of lecture and 221 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: BARB 1120 (Level 2) with a grade of "C" or better
 
BARB 1220                   Barbering Level 4
9 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Level 4 segment requiring advanced shaving, salon hair techniques, salon facials, permanent waving, salon hair cutting, salon hair coloring, salon chemical relaxing, and hair replacement. Additional topics applicable to barbering are also covered. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a barber. This is the fourth of four consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School 72 hours of lecture and 248 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: COSM 1200 (Level 3) with a grade of "C" or better.
Advisory: Must be 17 years of age when applying for New Mexico state Board Examination.
 
COSM 111                    Theory I
1 Credit Hour
This course orients the student to cosmetology, specifically in the areas of professional image, first aid, and ethics. This course provides an overview of the demands of the profession and the self-discipline needed to succeed in the field. 

COSM 111E                   Esthetician Theory
1 Credit Hour
This course orients the student to the skin care career, specifically in the areas of professional image, first aid, and ethics. This course provides an overview of the demands of the profession and the self-discipline needed to succeed in the field.

COSM 111M                   Manicurist/Esthetician Theory
1 Credit Hour
This course orients the student to the field of Manicurist/Esthetician, specifically in the areas of professional image, first aid, and ethics. This course provides an overview of the demands of the profession and the self-discipline needed to succeed in the field.

COSM 111N                    Nail Technology Theory
1 Credit Hour
This course orients the student to the field of Nail Technology, specifically in the areas of professional image, first aid, and ethics. This course provides an overview of the demands of the profession and the self-discipline needed to succeed in the field. 

COSM 112                        Haircutting I
2 Credit Hours
This first of three haircutting courses includes theory and practice related to haircutting, including anatomy and physiology as well as the preparation and procedures for the use of shears, scissors, razors and clippers on mannequins. Students are indoctrinated in safety practices as well as products related to the various haircutting procedures. 

COSM 112A                    Haircutting II
2 Credit Hours
This second of three haircutting courses includes theory and practice related to haircutting, including additional anatomy and physiology as well as the preparation and advanced safety practices as well as products related to the various haircutting procedures are covered. Practice opportunities for client consultation, record keeping, and haircutting are provided.
Prerequisites: COSM 111, COSM 112, COSM 115, COSM 132, AND COSM 142 

COSM 113                        Theory
3 Credit Hours
This course orients the student to the applied area of study, specifically in the areas of state laws and regulations, professional image, first aid, chemistry, electricity, job seeking, and ethics. This course provides an overview of the demands of the profession and the self-discipline needed to succeed in the field of study. 

COSM 115                        Manicuring / Pedicuring
5 Credit Hours
This course utilizes a combination of theory, lab practice, and clinical hands-on work to present the techniques of manicuring and pedicuring as they relate to anatomy and physiology. Also included are preparation and procedures, massage and advanced nail techniques, client consultation and recommendations, as well as client record keeping and safety. 

COSM 115A                    Manicure / Pedicure
5 Credit Hours
This course covers the theory, anatomy, physiology, preparation, procedures and practices, products, materials and implements. The theory of massage, advanced nail techniques, client consultation and recommendations as well as client recordkeeping and safety. 

COSM 120                    Haircutting/Beard Trimming
10 Credit Hours
This course includes theory, anatomy, physiology, shaving, honing, stropping, preparation, procedures and practice. Use of shears, razor and clippers products, materials and implements, client consultation and recommendations, client record keeping and safety. 

COSM 121                        Theory II
1 Credit Hour
This course covers the areas of hairstyling, haircutting, facials, safety and sanitation, electricity, and related topics as applied within the field of barbering and cosmetology.
Prerequisites: COSM 142 and the NM Board of Barbers and Cosmetologists Student License Permit Number 

COSM 122                        Natural Nail Care
2 Credit Hours
This course utilizes a combination of theory, lab practice, and clinical hands-on work to present the techniques of manicuring and pedicuring as they relate to anatomy and physiology. Also included are preparation and procedures, massage, client consultation, and recommendations, as well as client recordkeeping and safety.

COSM 123                        Advanced Nail Care
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to artificial nail technology. The care and application of acrylic nails, nail wraps, gel systems, and other advanced artificial nail technology.
Prerequisite: COSM 122 Natural Nail Care.

COSM 124                        Hairstyling
4 Credit Hours
This course combines theory and practice of hairstyling to include the anatomy and physiology, preparation, practice, and procedures related to hairstyling along with the associated materials and implements. Students will practice safety procedures and styling techniques including wet styling, blow-drying, finger waving, air waving, and hair pressing. Students will perform consultations with clients including hair analysis, recommendations, and record keeping.
Prerequisites: COSM 111, COSM 112, COSM 115, COSM 132, and COSM 142

COSM 126                        Haircutting
6 Credit Hours
This course includes theory, anatomy, physiology, preparation, procedures and practice. Use of shears, razor and clippers products, materials and implements, client consultation and recommendations, client record keeping and safety.
COSM 132                        Sterilization and Sanitation
2 Credit Hours
This course covers safety, preparation, procedures, practice, products, materials and implements, theory for personal and public safety, methods of sanitation and sterilization, chemical agents, types of bacteria, bacterial growth, and infections.

COSM 133                        Sanitation, Sterilization and Bacteria
3 Credit Hours
This course covers related theory and safety, preparation, procedures, practice, products, materials and implements, theory for personal and public safety, methods of sanitation and sterilization, chemical agents, types of bacteria, bacterial growth, infections and infection control and safety standards.

COSM 142                        Shampoo, Rinses, and Scalp Treatments
2 Credit Hours
This course covers preparation, procedures and practice, products, materials, implements, and related theory. Additional topics presented include related theory in anatomy, physiology, hair analysis, disorders of hair and scalp, related chemistry, client record keeping and safety.

COSM 143                        Shampoo, Rinses and Scalp Treatments
3 Credit Hours
This course covers theory, anatomy, physiology, preparation, procedures and practice, products, materials, implements, hair analysis, disorders of hair and scalp, hair and scalp treatments, related chemistry, client record keeping and safety.

COSM 153                        Independent Study
3 Credit Hours
Developed as an independent clinic practice and make-up class for missed hours. This course is the practice of all skills and knowledge learned in related courses.

COSM 163                        Hairstyling
3 Credit Hours
This course combines theory, anatomy, physiology, preparation, procedures and practice, products, materials and implements, hair analysis and client consultation, related chemistry, client record keeping and safety.

COSM 191                        Shampoo / Rinse HS Part 2
1 Credit Hour
This course is for year one cosmetology high school students who will be transitioning into the college cosmetology program. This course covers preparation, procedures and practice, products, materials, implements and related theory, anatomy, physiology, hair analysis, disorders of the hair and scalp, related chemistry, client record keeping and safety.
COSM 191T                      Nail Tech Theory Spec. Topic
1 Credit Hour
This course orients the student to the field of nail technology, specifically in the areas of professional image, first aid, and ethics. This course provides an overview of the demands of the profession and the self-discipline needed to succeed in the field.
COSM      192                    Mani/Pedicuring for HS Part 2
2 Credit Hours
This course is for year one high school cosmetology students to transition into the college cosmetology program. This course covers related theory, anatomy, physiology, preparation, procedure, and practice, products, materials and implements, theory of massage, client consultation and recommendations, client record keeping and safety.

COSM      192A                 Hairstyling Transition
2 Credit Hours
This course combines theory and practice of hairstyling to include anatomy, physiology, preparation, practice, and procedures related to hairstyling along with associated materials and implements. Students will practice safety procedures and styling techniques including wet styling, blow drying, finger waving, air waving, and hair pressing.  

COSM      194                   Med/Ped Practicum Spec. Topic
4 Credit Hours
This course is the capstone course for the Nail Tech program. It provides concentrated clinical practice for students in a supervised lab setting in preparation for the State Board Exam. This course can only be taken after the successful completion of all other required departmental courses.  

COSM 211                        Theory III
1 Credit Hour
This course covers theoretical knowledge appropriate for haircutting, chemistry, hair additions, chemical texturizing, and hair coloring as applied to the field of barbering and cosmetology. Emphasis will also be given to safety and sanitation or client protection.
Prerequisites: COSM 225 and the NM Board of Barbers and Cosmetologists Student License Permit Number 

COSM  212B                   Haircutting III
2 Credit Hours
This third-of-three haircutting courses includes advanced theory and practice related to haircutting. The course emphasizes advanced safety practices as well as products related to a variety of complex haircutting procedures on clientele in the lab setting. Practice opportunities for client consultation, record keeping, and haircutting are provided.
Prerequisites are completion of Semester I and II of the Cosmetology Certificate program with a grade of “C” or better in each class.  

COSM  213                       Hair Coloring
3 Credit Hours
This course explores the hair analysis procedures and related chemical actions involved in temporary, semi-permanent, and permanent color applications. Applications include bleaching, tinting, toning, frosting, special effects, and problems specific to the client. The student will consult with the client to make recommendations, perform record keeping, and practice safe methods.
Prerequisites: Completion of Semester I and II of the Cosmetology Certificate program with a grade of “C” or better in each class. 

COSM 215                        Chemical Rearranging/Perms and Relaxers
5 Credit Hours
This course covers theory, preparation, procedures, and practice related to the chemical rearranging (including perms) of hair. Included are theory related to anatomy and physiology of hair as well as common products, materials, and implements. Students will consult with clients to analyze hair, perform the chemical procedure, and maintain proper record keeping while following approved safety measures.
Prerequisites: Completion of Semester I and II of the Cosmetology Certificate program with a grade of "C" or better in each class. 

COSM 215A                    Mani/Pedi Clinical Practicum 1
5 Credit Hours
This is the first of a two-part capstone for the Nail Technology program.  It provides concentrated clinical practice for students in a supervised lab setting in preparation for the State Board Exam.  This course can only be taken after the successful completion of all other required departmental courses.   

COSM 215B                    Mani/Pedi Clinical Practicum 2
5 Credit Hours
This is the second of a two-part capstone for the Nail Technology program.  It provides concentrated clinical practice for students in a supervised lab setting in preparation for the State Board Exam.  This course can only be taken after the successful completion of all other required departmental courses.   

COSM 216                        Chemical Rearranging/Perms and Relaxers
6 Credit Hours
This course covers theory, preparation, procedures, and practice related to the chemical rearranging (including perms) of hair. Included are theory related to anatomy and physiology of hair as well as common products, materials, and implements. Students will consult with clients to analyze hair, perform the chemical procedure, and maintain proper record keeping while following approved safety measures.
Prerequisites: Completion of Semester I and II of the Cosmetology Certificate program with a grade of “C” or better in each class.

COSM 220                        Cosmetology / Barbering Clinical Practicum
10 Credit Hours
This course is the capstone course for the cosmetology program. It provides concentrated clinical practice for the student in a supervised lab setting in preparation for the State Board Exam. This class can only be taken after the successful completion of all other required departmental classes.
Prerequisites: Completion of Semester I, II, and III of the Cosmetology Certificate program with a grade of C or better in each class.

COSM 220A                       Clinical Practicum I
3 Credit Hours
This course is to apply by the instructor to strengthen student performance in curriculum related areas, or for supervised field trips and other course related training.
COSM 220B                       Clinical Practicum II
3 Credit Hours
This course is to apply by the instructor to strengthen student performance in curriculum related areas, or for supervised field trips and other course related training.

COSM 220C                    Clinical Practicum III
3 Credit Hours
This course is to apply by the instructor to strengthen student performance in curriculum related areas, or for supervised field trips and other course related training.

COSM 220E                     Esthetician Practicum
10 Credit Hours
This course is the capstone course for the Esthetician program. It provides concentrated clinical practice for students in a supervised lab setting in preparation for the State Board Exam. Prerequisites: This course can only be taken after the successful completion of all other required departmental courses.

COSM 220M                   Manicurist / Facialist Practicum
10 Credit Hours
This course is the capstone course for the Manicurist / Facialist program. It provides concentrated clinical practice for students in a supervised lab setting in preparation for the State Board Exam.
Prerequisites: This course can only be taken after the successful completion of all other required departmental courses.

COSM 222                       Salon Business / Board Review
2 Credit Hours
This course is taken during the last semester of the Cosmetology Program. It provides theoretical discussion and presentations relating to opening a salon and creating a business plan. Issues reviewed are written agreements, related regulations and laws, salon operations, policies, practices, personnel, compensation, payroll deductions, telephone etiquette, advertising, retail and salesmanship, client communication, public relations, insurance, and salon safety. Theoretical components of the departmental courses are reviewed in preparation for the written portion of the State Board Exam.

COSM 225                        Facials
5 Credit Hours
This course covers theory and practice associated with performing facials in the related areas of anatomy and physiology, preparation and procedures, appropriate products, materials, and implements, treatments, and make-up application. Students will practice safe techniques while using electrical appliances and currents, specialized treatment machines, applying artificial eyelashes, removal of unwanted hair, eyelash and brow tinting, and light therapy. Students will practice performing client consultation, making recommendations, and keeping accurate records.
Prerequisites: COSM 111, COSM 112, COSM 115, COSM 132, and COSM 142

COSM 232                        Testing and Student Evaluation
2 Credit Hours
This course will cover measurement of student skills and achievement. This course will include diagnosis student strengths and weaknesses, promote motivation for study, and assist in the development and assessment of oral, written, and practical tests.

COSM 234                        Professional Educator
4 Credit Hours
This course orients the student in the fundamentals of business management.  It will also present the important steps required in developing a professional development plan and the qualities for satisfactory performance within each area of performance. This course emphasizes the importance of pursuing instruction as a professional educator.

COSM 243                        Barber / Crossover
4 Credit Hours
This course covers related theory, anatomy, physiology, preparation, procedures and practice in shaving of the face, products, materials, and implements.

COSM 247A                    Laboratory Supervision
7 Credit Hours
This course will present material in the following areas: independent clinic supervision, client communication, reception desk supervision, inventory control, effective dispensary procedures, supervision of clinic sanitation, client safety and supervision of student’s technical skills.

COSM 253                        Instructor Theory
3 Credit Hours
This course includes orientation, state laws and regulations, employment and compensation information,  professional ethics, image, effective communications, first aid, chemistry, electricity, job seeking, ethics, principles of teaching, teacher maturity, student learning principles and academic advising.

COSM 262                         Teaching Aids
2 Credit Hours
This course covers films/videos, charts, mannequins, reference materials, chalkboards, overhead projectors and transparencies.

COSM 263                        Teaching Methods
3 Credit Hours
This course covers preparation, presentation, application, testing, lecture and workbooks. Demonstrations and return demonstrations, discussion, question and answer, projects and field trips.

COSM 273                        Instructor Clinic
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover the fundamentals of business management, to be applied by instructor to strengthen student performance in curriculum areas for supervised field trips and other course related training cosmetology course.

 

COSM 1100                    Cosmetology Level 1
9 Credit Hours
This course includes basic hair styling, manicures, facials, day makeup, permanent waving, scalp treatments, hair cutting, tinting, and bleaching. Additional topics applicable to cosmetology are also covered. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a cosmetologist. This is the first of five consecutive segments. This is a nine (9) credit hour course. Pivot Point Member School. 135 hours of lecture and 185 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: 10th grade education or equivalent.

 

COSM 1120                    Cosmetology Level 2
9 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Level 2 segment requiring basic hairstyling, manicuring, pedicuring, acrylic nails with form, nail wraps, tips, mends/repairs, facials, makeup, permanent waving, scalp treatments, hair cutting, tinting, bleaching, soft permanent wave, and sodium hydroxide chemical relaxing. Additional topics applicable to cosmetology are also covered. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a cosmetologist. This is the second of five consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School. 135 hours of lecture and 185 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: COSM 1100 (Level 1) with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

 

COSM 1130                    Cosmetology Level 3
9 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Level 3 segment requiring hair design, manicuring and pedicuring, acrylic nails, nail repair, facials and corrective makeup, scalp and hair treatments, hair sculpture, hair color design, chemical texturizing, permanent waving, chemical relaxing and curl reformation. Additional topics applicable to cosmetology are also covered. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a cosmetologist. This is the third of five consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School. 99 hours of lecture and 221 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: COSM 1120 (Level 2) with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

 

COSM 1200                    Cosmetology Level 4
9 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Level 4 segment requiring advanced hair techniques, artificial nails, facials, makeup, airbrush makeup, and chemical texturing, hair sculpting, extension, color design, texture/chemical relaxing. Additional topics applicable to cosmetology are also covered. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a cosmetologist. This is the fourth of five consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School. 72 hours of lecture and 248 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: COSM 1130 (Level 3) with a grade of ‘C’ or better

 

COSM 1220                    Cosmetology Level 5
9 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Level 5 segment requiring salon thermal hair curling, salon hair sculpting, permanent wave design, salon color design, salon chemical relaxing using sodium hydroxide, salon nail sculpture, and salon facials. Additional topics applicable to advanced cosmetology salon techniques are also covered. This course also includes New Mexico Board of Barbering and Cosmetology mock written and performance exams. The program is designed toward preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering ad Cosmetology licensure examination and a successful career as a cosmetologist. This is the fifth of five consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School. 72 hours of lecture and 248 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: COSM 1200 (Level 4) with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

 

ESTH 1100                      Beginning Esthetics
9 Credit Hours
This course includes basic skin care procedures and techniques; analysis of skin; facial treatments (manual, electrical, and chemical); facial massage manipulations; temporary hair removal (tweezing and waxing); makeup techniques and applications; health, safety, and sanitation precautions and procedures; bacteriology, chemistry, electricity, anatomy and physiology; professional ethics, hygiene, personality development, personal and professional management. Related subjects, as they are applicable to esthetics, are covered. This course is designed for preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering and Cosmetology Examination, and a successful career as an esthetician. This is the first of two consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School 135 hours of lecture and 185 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: 10th grade education or equivalent.

 

ESTH 1120                      Advanced Esthetics
9 Credit Hours
This course includes an advanced study of skin care procedures and techniques; analysis of the skin, facial treatments (manual, electrical, and chemical); facial massage manipulations (European, lymphatic, and acupressure); temporary hair removal (tweezing, depilatories, and waxing)l makeup techniques and applications; hygiene, health, safety, and sanitation precautions and procedures; chemistry, electricity; professional ethics, growth and personality development; personal, professional, and business management; advanced topics  and procedures (aromatherapy, spa treatments, chemical exfoliation). Related subjects, as they are applicable to esthetics are covered. This course is designed for preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering and Cosmetology Examination, and a successful career as an esthetician. This is the second of two consecutive segments. Pivot Point Member School 135 hours of lecture and 185 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: ESTH 1100 (Level 1) with a grade of ‘C’ or better.

 

ESTH 1130 – 1134     Advanced Topics in Esthetics
1 – 5 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Esthetician industry that requires advanced training, continuing education, and provide professional growth for licensed estheticians and cosmetologists. The course will be offered in modules of advanced topics. Credit may vary from 1 to 5 credits depending upon the module. Consult the published course schedule to verify specific topic areas and credit offered for each topic. Pivot Point Member School. 54 hours of lecture and 162 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: 10th grade education or equivalent; ESTH 1120 (level 2) with a grade of ‘C’ or better OR a valid Esthetician or Cosmetology license.

 

ESTH 1135                                              Advanced Makeup - Microdermabrasion
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Esthetics industry which requires advanced training, continuing education, and provide professional growth for licensed estheticians and cosmetologists. This course will be offered in two modules. Module One will cover advanced makeup and Module Two will cover microdermabrasion techniques. Pivot Point Member School. 36 hours of lecture and 108 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: 10th grade education or equivalent; ESTH 1120 (level 2) with a grade of ‘C’ or better OR a valid Esthetician or Cosmetology license
 
ESTH 1140                                              Advanced Exfoliation - Microdermabrasion
2 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Esthetics industry which requires advanced training, continuing education, and provide professional growth for licensed estheticians and cosmetologists. This course will cover advanced exfoliation using microdermabrasion techniques. Pivot Point Member School. 18 hours lecture and 54 laboratory hours. This course is designed to meet the needs of the Esthetics industry which requires advanced training, continuing education, and provide professional growth for licensed estheticians and cosmetologists. Prerequisite: 10th grade education or equivalent; ESTH 1120 (level 2) with a grade of ‘C’ or better OR a valid Esthetician or Cosmetology license

 

ESTH 1145                                              Advanced Makeup – Air Brush
2 Credit Hours
This course is designed to meet the needs of the Esthetics industry which requires advanced training, continuing education, and provide professional growth for licensed estheticians and cosmetologists. This course will cover advanced makeup – air brush techniques. Pivot Point Member School. 18 hours lecture and 54 laboratory hours. This course is designed to meet the needs of the Esthetics industry which requires advanced training, continuing education, and provide professional growth for licensed estheticians and cosmetologists. Prerequisite: 10th grade education or equivalent; ESTH 1120 (level 2) with a grade of ‘C’ or better OR a valid Esthetician or Cosmetology license

 

MNPD 1100                                           Manicurist / Pedicurist Level 1
4 Credit Hours
This course orients students to the field of nail technology, including professional image, first aid, and ethics. Also covered are personal and public safety, sanitation and sterilization, and chemical agents. This course is designed for preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering and Cosmetology Examination, and a successful career as a nail technician. This is the first of four consecutive segments and is a four (4) credit hour course. Pivot Point Member School. 80 hours of lecture and 55 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: 10th grade education or equivalent.
 
MNPD 1120                                           Manicurist / Pedicurist Level 2
4 Credit Hours
This course presents the basic techniques of manicuring and pedicuring as they relate to anatomy and physiology, including preparation and procedures, massage, client consultation and recommendations, as well as client record keeping and safety. This course is designed for preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering and Cosmetology Examination, and a successful career as a nail technician. This is the second of four consecutive segments and is a four (4) credit hour course. Pivot Point Member School. 65 hours of lecture and 70 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: MNPD 1100 (Level 1) with a grade of a ‘C’ or better.
 
MNPD 1200                                           Manicurist / Pedicurist Level 3
4 Credit Hours
This course presents advanced techniques of manicuring and pedicuring as well as providing students a supervised laboratory setting to work with clients. This course is designed for preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering and Cosmetology Examination, and a successful career as a nail technician. This is the third of four consecutive segments and is a four (4) credit hour course. Pivot Point Member School. 54 hours of lecture and 81 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: MNPD 1120 (Level 2) with a grade of a ‘C’ or better

 

MNPD 1220                                           Manicurist / Pedicurist Level 4
4 Credit Hours
This course provides concentrated clinical practice for students in a supervised lab setting in preparation for licensure. This course is designed for preparation for the New Mexico Board of Barbering and Cosmetology Examination, and a successful career as a nail technician. This is the fourth of four consecutive segments and is a four (4) credit hour course. Pivot Point Member School. 40 hours of lecture and 95 laboratory hours. Prerequisite: MNPD 1200 (Level 3) with a grade of a ‘C’ or better
CJ 113                                 Introduction to Criminal Justice (same as LA 113)
3 Credit Hours
This course will explain the development and philosophy of criminal justice in a democratic society and an introduction to agencies involved in the administration of criminal justice. Discussion will include the goals of the police, history of the criminal justice system, how the system functions within the context of government to protect individual rights as well as constitutionally imposed restrictions on the system.

CJ 113B                               Substantive Criminal Law (same as LA 113B)
3 Credit Hours
This course will explain the history of criminal law, the principles of criminal procedure, and the essential components of constitutional, statutory, and common law.

CJ 113C                               Crime in America
3 Credit Hours
This course will emphasize the nature of crime in the United States including the evolution of Law as we know it. Topics addressed include basic theories of criminal behavior, characteristics of major crimes, and sociological, demographic and psychological characteristics of those who commit crimes.

CJ 113D                              Probation, Parole & Community
3 Credit Hours
This course will explain the role of community corrections within the Criminal Justice System, operation of the correctional institution, alternatives to incarceration, treatment and rehabilitation of offenders, distinction between parole and probation, and the legal basis governing the supervision of juvenile and adult offenders placed on probation or parole.

CJ 113E                               Introduction to the Courts (same as LA 113E)
3 Credit Hours
This course will explain the history of the courts, as well as the organization, structure, and jurisdiction of the judicial system.

CJ 113F                               Juvenile Justice & Delinquency
3 Credit Hours
This course will explain the organization, functions, and jurisdiction of juvenile agencies. Discussion includes the juvenile court and justice system, historical development of the concept of delinquency, the special status of juveniles under the law, and special attention to juvenile justice procedural law under the Children’s Code and Rules of Procedure.

CJ 113J                                Introduction to Corrections
3 Credit Hours
This introductory course is designed to acquaint individuals with the role of corrections in America. It is an examination of the broad spectrum of systems, processes, and people that constitute the field of corrections. Whenever possible, practical orientation to the field of corrections will be explored.

CJ 113P                               Police & Society (same as LA 113P)
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction in the study of law enforcement and policing in America. It will explore diversity and critically evaluate the direction and trends in modern police agencies.  The student will become familiar with the names, phrases, and concepts that are routinely used by those in the study of crime and the workings of the criminal justice system.

CJ 123F                               Traffic Law & Accident Investigation
3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the theories and basic techniques of accident investigation: what the vehicle shows, examination of the roadway, recording and preservation of skid mark evidence, speed estimates, reconstruction of the accident scene, diagram and map making, photographing the accident scene, background investigation, court testimony, and study of the New Mexico vehicle code.

CJ 123J                             Corrections Officer Safety and Weapons Training (same as CA 123J)
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover basic shooting principles used by correctional officer and will include instruction in nomenclature, handling, loading and firing of the service revolver, rifle, shotgun, and 37 mm gas gun.  Lawful use of chemical agents including identification, coding, delivery and decontamination procedures will be covered.

CJ 123P                              Law Enforcement Patrol Procedures
3 Credit Hours
This is a course involving basic patrol concepts including high risk and unknown risk patrol tactics, handling special needs individuals, domestic violence, disorderly conduct, public disturbances, intoxication, vehicle/foot patrol, and observation. Also, basic techniques for arrest/custody, supervision, transportation of prisoners, handling crimes in progress, preliminary investigations, conduct at crime scenes, and officer survival will be covered.

CJ 191-296 (A-Z)               Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

CJ 213A                              Criminal Investigation
3 Credit Hours
This course will identify the fundamentals of criminal investigation. It will include conduct at crime scenes, collection and preservation of evidence, interviews and interrogations, crime scene photography and sketching, and report writing.

CJ 213B                              Criminal Procedure (same as LA 213B)
3 Credit Hours
This course will concentrate on substantive criminal law, general rules, principles, and doctrines of criminal liability in the United States; and classifications of crimes against persons, property, and the public welfare.

CJ 213C                              Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System
3 Credit Hours
This course is a survey of constitutional law. It includes an overview of the U.S. legal system; the authority, jurisdiction, and influence of the U.S. Supreme Court; constitutional guarantees to citizens, and constitutional amendments which influence the criminal justice system. Specific attention will be given to equal protection under the law (balancing individual, state, and federal rights), and the first, second, fourth, fifth, sixth, and eighth amendments.

CJ 213D                              New Mexico Law
3 Credit Hours
This course will focus on the substantive provisions of the New Mexico Criminal Code with particular emphasis on those areas, which have proven to be the most common problem areas for the law enforcement community.

CJ 213F                               Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensics
3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of physical evidence found at crime scenes, updated techniques for proper collection and preservation of crime scene evidence, and various forms of forensic analysis. Also covered will be the topic of DNA in a manner that is comprehensible to students who lack a scientific background.

CJ 223A                              Criminal Investigation II
3 Credit Hours
A continuation of Criminal Investigation I concentrating on specific investigations according to the type of crime. Special emphasis is placed on homicide investigations and the rules of search and seizure.

CJ 223B                              Introduction to Victimology
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the crime victim as a larger part of our society and as a participant in the criminal justice system. The student will be introduced to criminal victimization in the United States and their role the victim plays I the criminal justice system. Additionally, the course will address crime, abuse, rape, elderly victims, children as victims, victim service programs, and compensation / restitution.

CJ 223C                              Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs
3 Credit Hours
This course will emphasize the pharmacological properties of abused drugs, common abuse patterns, field-testing, evidence requirements, and investigation techniques utilized in narcotics and dangerous drug investigations.
CJ 250-256                       Topics in Advanced Training for Law Enforcement and / or Corrections
This course will include law enforcement and / or corrections advanced curriculum which meets State of New Mexico accreditation standards and requirements for continuing certification. The specific topic for the course will be announced each semester. This course may be taken for one-half credit up to a maximum of six credit hours and may be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor
THEA 1110                        Introduction to Theatre
3 Credit Hours
This class is a general introduction to the art of theatre for non-majors and majors. Various aspects of study include acting, directing, play writing, set design, dramatic theory, and theatre history. Students will have the opportunity to study this art form from its known origins to modern day.
 
THEA 1220                        Beginning Acting
3 Credit Hours
This course serves as an introduction to the theory and practice of acting. Students will learn various terms, techniques, and practices of acting and will demonstrate their understanding in class. Through exercises and improvisations, partnered scenes, and group work, student will be better able to appreciate the work of others as they learn techniques of performing.

DR 191-296 (A-Z)             Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
EC 113                                Introduction to Economics
3 Credit Hours
An introductory course in economics designed for non-business majors. This course will introduce students to macro and micro economic principles and how they apply to individual well-being, society, and domestic and global issues in today's world.
EC 191-296 (A-Z)              Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

ECON 2110                         Macroeconomic Principles
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce macro-economic theory and public policy, concepts of national income, monetary and fiscal policy as means of regulating the economy by solving the problems of unemployment, inflation, and inconsistent economic growth.

ECON 2120                        Microeconomic Principles
3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of the study of the principles of law emphasizing property, advanced contract law, debtor-creditor relations, bankruptcy and Uniform Commercial Code topics including sales, negotiable instruments, secured transactions and documents of title.
ECED 1110                       Child Growth, Development and Learning  
3 Credit Hours
This basic course in the growth, development, and learning of young children prenatal through age eight, provides students with the theoretical foundation for becoming competent early childhood professionals. The course includes knowledge of how young children grow, develop, and learn. Major theories of child development are integrated with all domains of development, including biological-physical, social, cultural, emotional, cognitive, and language. The adult’s role in supporting each child’s growth, development, and learning is emphasized.

 

ECED 1115                      Health, Safety and Nutrition  
2 Credit Hours
This course provides information related to standards and practices that promote children’s physical and mental well-being, sound nutritional practices, and maintenance of safe learning environments. It includes information for developing sound health and safety management procedures for indoor and outdoor learning environments for young children. The course examines the many scheduling factors that are important for children’s total development, healthy nutrition, physical activity, and rest.

 

ECED 1120                        Guiding Young Children
3 Credit Hours
This course explores various theories of child guidance and the practical applications of each. It provides developmentally appropriate methods for guiding children and effective strategies and suggestions for facilitating positive social interactions. Strategies for preventing challenging behaviors through the use of environment, routines, and schedule will be presented. Emphasis is placed on helping children become self-responsible, competent, independent, and cooperative learning, including families as part of the guidance approach.

 

ECED 1125                       Assessment of Children & Evaluation of Programs  
3 Credit Hours
This basic course familiarizes students with a variety of culturally appropriate assessment methods and instruments, including systematic observation of typically and non-typically developing children. The course addresses the development and use of formative and summative assessment and evaluation instruments to ensure comprehensive quality of the total environment for children, families, and the community. Students will develop skills for evaluating the assessment process and involving other teachers, professionals, and families in the process.
 
ECED 1130                        Family  & Community Collaboration
3 Credit Hours
This beginning course examines the involvement of families and communities from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds in early childhood programs. Ways to establish collaborative relationships with families in early childhood settings are discussed. Families’ goals and desires for their children will be supported through culturally responsive strategies.
 
ECED 2110                         Professionalism
2 Credit Hours
This course provides a broad-based orientation to the field of early care and education. Early childhood history, philosophy, ethics, and advocacy are introduced. Basic principles of early childhood systems are explored. Multiple perspectives on early care and education are introduced. Professional responsibilities such as cultural responsiveness and reflective practice are examined.

 

ECED 2115                      Introduction to Language, Literacy & Reading  
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to prepare early childhood professionals for promoting children’s emergent literacy and reading development. Through a developmental approach the course addresses ways in which early childhood professionals can foster young children’s oral language development, phonemic awareness, and literacy problem solving skills, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. This course provides the foundation for early childhood professionals to become knowledgeable about literacy development in young children. Instructional approaches as well as theory-based and research-based strategies to support the emergent literacy and reading skills of native speakers and English language learners will be presented.

ECED 2120                       Curriculum Development through Play Birth – Age 4  (Pre-K)
3 Credit Hours
The beginning curriculum course places play at the center of curriculum in developmentally appropriate early childhood programs. It addresses content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSPs) is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized.
Corequisite: ED 112A Practicum for Curriculum Development through Play (Birth-Age 4/Pre-K)

 

ECED 2121                        Curriculum Development through Play Birth – Age 4 (Pre-K) Practicum
2 Credit Hours
This beginning practicum course is a co-requisite with ED 113B Curriculum Development through Play (Birth-Age 4/Pre-K). The field-based component of this course will provide experiences that address curriculum content that is relevant for children birth through age four in developmentally and culturally sensitive ways of integrating content into teaching and learning experiences. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of Individualized Family Service Plans (IFSPs) is included. Curriculum development in all areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health, science, social skills, and adaptive learning for children, birth through age four, is emphasized. Co-requisite:  ED 113B Curriculum Development through Play (Birth-Age 4/Pre-K)

 

ECED 2130                      Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 (Pre-K) through Grade 3  
3 Credit Hours
The curriculum course focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age 3 through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) is included. Corequisite: ED 212 Curriculum Development and Implementation Practicum: Age 3 (Pre-K) through Grade 3

ECED 2131                        Curriculum Development & Implementation Practicum: Age 3 (Pre K) - Grade 3 Practicum           
2 Credit Hours                
The beginning practicum course is a co-requisite with ED 223C Curriculum Development and implementation: Age 3 through Grade 3. The field-based component of this course will provide experiences that address developmentally appropriate curriculum content in early childhood programs, age three through third grade. Development and implementation of curriculum in all content areas, including literacy, numeracy, the arts, health and emotional wellness, science, motor and social skills is emphasized. Information on adapting content areas to meet the needs of children with special needs and the development of Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) is included.
Co-requisite: ED 223C Curriculum Development and Implementation: Age 3 (Pre K) through Grade 3

ED 191-296 (A-Z)    Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
 
ED 213F                             Educational Psychology (Same as PS 213F)
3 Credit Hours
This psychology course will provide the student with useful concepts and principles of educational psychology that can be used for upcoming or practicing teachers. Throughout the book, the author offers students practical perspectives for meeting the complex challenges of teaching and ways to apply various educational psychology concepts and principles for working with students in a classroom setting.

 

EDUC 2110                         Foundations of Education
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to assist future teachers in gaining an understanding of the purposes and framework of schools. Topics covered in this course include, but are not limited to ethics, legal issues, and leadership relative to education. The dynamic role of teachers is also explored. This is a three (3) credit hour course.

EDUC 2410                       Early Literacy & Young Children

3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to help students gain knowledge and skills needed to assist children in the areas of reading and writing development in the early elementary grades. Emphasis will be placed on phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary development, and comprehension. Informal assessment tools will be introduced to students as the basis for designing curriculum to meet children’s individual needs. 

EDUC 2415                        Elementary Curriculum & Teaching Methods

3 Credit Hours
This course will emphasize effective teaching methods and lesson design for the elementary level (Kindergarten – 8th grade) that promotes hands-on learning and encompasses state standards. Strategies for leading a class in small and large group settings as well as maintaining a classroom environment that is conducive to learning will be emphasized. Practicum assignments allow students the opportunities to evaluate the effectiveness of their curriculum activities and teaching methods.


EDUC 2420                        Teaching Reading for the Elementary Classroom
3 Credit Hours
An exploration of developmentally, culturally and linguistically appropriate, formal and informal research- based assessments and teaching strategies in the teaching of reading in grades K-8. This course includes a structured 10-hour field component. This is a three (3) credit hour course..

EDUC 2998                         Internship in Education Foundations
3 Credit Hours
The student enrolled in this course will be assigned to an elementary classroom. Class meetings will provide opportunities to reflect and to discuss experiences. Communication, classroom management, organization, and lesson preparation will be emphasized. The student must attain a “B” or better in order to pass this course. Prerequisite(s): ED 243 Teaching Elementary Reading, ED 243A Elementary Curriculum & Teaching Methods, and ED 243B Early Literacy & Young Children.
ENGL 1110                Composition I
3 Credit Hours
In this course, students will read, write, and think about a variety of issues and texts. They will develop reading and writing skills that will help with the writing required in their fields of study and other personal and professional contexts. Students will learn to analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading and writing. They will also gain an understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. Students will learn to analyze the rhetorical context of any writing task and compose with purpose, audience, and genre in mind. Students will reflect on their own writing processes, learn to workshop drafts with other writers, and practice techniques for writing, revising, and editing. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 113)

 

ENGL 1120                Composition II
3 Credit Hours
In this course, students will explore argument in multiple genres. Research and writing practices emphasize summary, analysis, evaluation, and integration of secondary sources. Students will analyze rhetorical situations in terms of audience, contexts, purpose, mediums, and technologies and apply this knowledge to their reading, writing, and research. Students will sharpen their understanding of how writing and other modes of communication work together for rhetorical purposes. The emphasis of this course will be on research methods. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 123)    Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 Composition I or EN 113 Composition and Rhetoric

 

ENGL 1410                Introduction to Literature
3 Credit Hours
In this course, students will examine a variety of literary genres, including fiction, poetry, and drama. Students will identify common literary elements in each genre, understanding how specific elements influence meaning. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 213) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature

 

ENGL 2210                Professional and Technical Communication
3 Credit Hours
Professional and Technical Communication will introduce students to the different types of documents and correspondence that they will create in their professional careers. This course emphasizes the importance of audience, document design, and the use of technology in designing, developing, and delivering documents. This course will provide students with experience in professional correspondence and communicating technical information to a non-technical audience. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 123A) 
Prerequisite: ENGL 1100 Composition I or EN 113 Composition and Rhetoric

 

ENGL 2310                Introduction to Creative Writing
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to the basic elements of creative writing, including short fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. Students will read and study published works as models, but the focus of this "workshop" course is on students revising and reflecting on their own writing. Throughout this course, students will be expected to read poetry, fiction, and non-fiction closely, and analyze the craft features employed. They will be expected to write frequently in each of these genres. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 213B) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature or consent of instructor

 

ENGL 2515                Types of Literature II
3 Credit Hours
This course examines selected literary works from one or more genres. The successful students’ critical thinking skills are developed through close reading of the genres presented and exploration into the cultural, social, political, and/or historical influences on the works. Writing assignments may include journaling, a research project, critical commentaries, and/or oral reports. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 223) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature

 

ENGL 2610                American Literature I
3 Credit Hours 
This course surveys American literature from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand the origins of American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to early American culture. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 213C) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature

 

ENGL 2620                American Literature II
3 Credit Hours
This course surveys American literature from the mid-nineteenth-century to the contemporary period. This course provides students with the contexts and documents necessary to understand American Literature and the aesthetic, cultural, and ideological debates central to American culture. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 223C) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature

 

ENGL 2630                British Literature I
3 Credit Hours
This course offers a study of British literature from its origins in Old English to the 18th century. This survey covers specific literary works, essays, short stories, novels, poems, and plays as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 213A) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature

 

ENGL 2640                British Literature II
3 Credit Hours
This course offers a study of British literature from the 18th century to the present. This survey covers specific literary works, short stories, novels, poems, and plays as well as the social, cultural, and intellectual currents that influenced the literature. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 223A) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature

 

ENGL 2650                World Literature I
3 Credit Hours
In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from ancient, medieval, and Renaissance literature. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 213D) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature

 

ENGL 2660                World Literature II
3 Credit Hours
In this course, students will read representative world masterpieces from the 1600s to the present. Students will broaden their understanding of literature and their knowledge of other cultures through exploration of how literature represents individuals, ideas and customs of world cultures. The course focuses strongly on examining the ways literature and culture intersect and define each other. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously EN 223D) Prerequisite: ENGL 1120 Composition II or EN 123 Composition and Literature

 

EN 191-296 (A-Z)       Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
ENGT 203                         Introduction to Oil & Gas
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces equipment, systems, instrumentation, and operations in industry. A variety of petroleum technologies as they relate to exploration, drilling, production, transportation, marketing and hydrocarbon processing will be covered.

ENGT 213                         Cyber Security for Energy Industry
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to protecting their computers and technology devices from cyber-attacks. Topics include analysis of cyber security, personal security, Internet security, mobile security, and risks to Internet and computer privacy.

ENGT 213A                     Environmental Health & Safety
3 Credit Hours
This course provides a working knowledge of the Hazardous Materials Transportation Regulations. The emphasis of the course is on definition of hazard classes using the hazardous materials table, marking, labeling, placarding, and shipping papers. Material from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, OSHA, and the Environmental Protection Agency is integrated throughout the course.

ENGT 213B                     Fundamentals of Instrumentation & Controllers
3 Credit Hours
In this course students will be introduced to a variety of detectors, including temperature, pressure, level, flow, and radiation; position indicators; and principles of control systems used in the various energy industries.

ENGT 213C                     Programmable Logic Controllers
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to the basics of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) used in industrial control systems, including electronic device-to-device interfacing, data communication, signal processing, data display, and control operations.

ENGT 213D                     Drilling Techniques & Operations
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to on and offshore well drilling practices and procedures involved in complex drilling operations. Topics covered will include rig equipment, casing design, fishing, and proper procedures to successfully drill a well.

ENGT 213E                      Petroleum Recovery & Production Methods
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to the equipment and processes used to produce oil and gas. Topics covered will include wellheads, pumping units, flow lines, valves, piping manifolds, separators, heater treaters, stock tanks, central tank batteries, pumps, and metering. This course covers unique problems during oil and gas production and important solutions to these challenges.

ENGT 213F                      Fundamentals of Prints & Drawings
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to print reading, engineering fluid diagrams, electrical diagrams, electronic schematics, logic diagrams, engineering fabrication, and construction drawings. This course should provide personnel and contractors who are associated with energy industry facility construction, operation, and maintenance a foundation in reading, interpreting, and using engineering prints and drawings.

ENGT 213G                     Fundamentals of Radiology Control
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to radiological control, physical sciences and ALARA (As-Low-As-Reasonable-Achievable) principles. This course covers mathematical fundamentals, nuclear physics, sources of radiation, and radiation exposure and control.

ENGT 213H                    Radiology Control Systems
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to radiation control and management systems. Statistical methods for radiation counting, radioactive air sampling practices, and radioactive contamination control procedures will be reviewed.

ENGT 223                         Fundamentals of Nuclear Science
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to fundamentals of nuclear science and nuclear physics and reactor theory. This course covers atomic physics, nuclear reactions, and detection of radiation.

ENGT 223A                     Thermodynamics, Heat Transfer, Fluid Flow
3 Credit Hours
This course will provide students with the basic principles of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and fluid flow. Students will be introduced to the properties of fluids, conduction, convection, radiation-heat transfer, and the relationship between types of energy in a fluid stream.

ENGT 223B                     Mechanical Science
3 Credit Hours
This course presents the basics of mechanical components, diesel engines, heat exchangers, pumps, and valves. Students will have the opportunity to understand the construction and operation of mechanical components associated with various energy industry facility and equipment operations and maintenance.

ENGT 223C                     Fundamentals of Vacuum Technology
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to methods and processes used in various energy industries. Students are introduced to the use of vacuum technology in the production of microelectronics, optics, specialty pharmaceuticals, chemical analysis, and other areas where high degrees of purity and cleanliness are required.

ENGT 223D                     Material Science
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to properties of materials used in most energy related industries along with the importance of material selection to safety, reliability, and the environment.

ENGT 223E                      Electrical Theory
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to basic electronic theory. This course covers how to identify electronic components used in communications and industrial equipment, how to calculate voltage and current in series and parallel circuits, and how to understand the basics of circuit design.

ENGT 223F                      Process Management
3 Credit Hours
This course presents methods for developing and managing process inputs, value added steps, outputs, and process metrics. The course introduces students to how well-managed processes save businesses warranty costs, increase product and service reliability, and increase customer satisfaction.

ENGT 223G                     Radiological Instrumentation
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to fundamental radiation detection methods and instruments. Portable and stationary laboratory radiation detection equipment will be reviewed with multiple applications.

ENGT 233                         Energy Technology Internship
3 Credit Hours
The internship course is hands-on work experience in the public or private sector that provides for workplace learning in an area of student career interest that relates to their specified degree program. This course will provide opportunities for students to gain expertise and knowledge that will enhance their skills necessary in the workplace. A minimum of 120 hours must be worked in order to get full credit.

ENGT 236                         Energy Technology Internship
6 Credit Hours
The internship course is hands-on work experience in the public or private sector that provides for workplace learning in an area of student career interest that relates to their specified degree program. This course will provide opportunities for students to gain expertise and knowledge that will enhance their skills necessary in the workplace. A minimum of 240 hours must be worked in order to get full credit.
ENMT 102                        Introduction Entertainment Industry
2 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to real world industry information and applications in both the business and technical areas. Topics will include industry employment, copyright and publishing, performance and recording contracts, and entertainment unions.
ENMT 103                        Acoustics
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to the concepts of physics as it applies to sound and sound reinforcement applications. Topics covered will include basic physical principles underlying sound, music, acoustics, and space.
ENMT 104                        Live Sound and Production I
4 Credit Hours
This course introduces the concepts and technical skills required for live event sound reinforcement. Topics covered will include operation of basic sound systems, analog audio applications, and acoustics.

ENMT 112                        ENMT Internship I
2 Credit Hours
This course will provide the student a real world, hands-on working situation. The student will be placed in an actual work environment for a minimum of 160 hours over a period of four weeks to gain on-the-job experience.

ENMT 113                        Entertainment Law & Management
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to the business and legal aspects of the entertainment industry. Topics covered will include performance rights, mechanical rights, inner band contracts, band partnership agreements, work for hire, songwriting and performance contracts, performance riders, recording contracts, copyright law, and publishing and industry management.

ENMT 114                        Electronics Technology I
4 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to electrical and electronic maintenance methods used in the areas of musical equipment and audio production. The course will cover safety, electrical and electronic fundamentals, basic math concepts used in electronics engineering, analog and digital test equipment, basic circuit diagnostics, interpretation and use of wiring diagrams, service manuals, system diagnosis and repair, and basic maintenance of cables, connectors, and devices.

ENMT 123                       Introduction to Video Producing & Editing
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to the concepts, theory, and practical knowledge of digital video editing in comtemporary media environments. The goal of the course is to develop students' understanding of the historical and creative contexts that contribute to digital video production and editing practice through lectures and hands-on experiences. Students will explore production and post-production processes, methods, and techniques.

ENMT 124                        Live Sound Production II
4 Credit Hours
This course covers additional concepts and technical skills required for live event sound reinforcement. Topics covered will include operation of digital sound systems, including digital consoles, amplifiers with built in DSP, speaker systems, line arrays, processors, and digital audio applications.
Prerequisite: ENMT 104 Live Sound Production I

ENMT 133                        Computers and Music
3 Credit Hours
This course is intended as a beginning course for students desiring to learn the use of software, synthesizers, drum programs, and sequencing programs to create music. It is a fundamental course that meets the standards set for audio programs across the country.

ENMT 143                       Computers and Music II
3 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of those concepts and principles, which were introduced in Computers, and Music I. Emphasis is placed on advanced sequencer workstation operation and synchronization in the interaction of recording systems. 
Prerequisite ENMT 133 Computers and Music I

ENMT 153                    Introduction to Audio
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to multi-track audio recording methods and techniques. Topics covered will include audio theory, acoustics, console and processor operation, microphones, multi-tracking mixing techniques, session procedures mix down, and CD burning.

ENMT 202                        Introduction to Multimedia Production
4 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to multi-track audio recording methods and techniques. Topics covered will include audio theory, acoustics, console and processor operation, microphones, multi-track mixing techniques, session procedures mix-down, and CD burning.

ENMT 203                        Live Music Production III
3 Credit Hours
This course continues the concepts and technical skills required for live event sound reinforcement. Topics covered will include operation of hybrid digital and analog sound systems, digital consoles, switching power supply amplifiers with build in DSP, powered and non-powered speaker systems, and powered line arrays.  
Prerequisite: ENMT 124 Live Sound Production II

ENMT 204                        Live Sound Production IV
4 Credit Hours
This course continues the concepts and technical skills required for live event sound reinforcement. Topics covered will include operation of hybrid digital and analog sound systems, IEM systems, amp racks, powered and non-powered speaker systems, powered and non-powered line arrays, and stage stacked monitoring systems.
Prerequisite: ENMT 203 Live Sound Production III.

ENMT 212                        Entertainment & Music Ensemble
2 Credit Hours
This course in an introduction to the individual and group skills necessary to produce a successful band or ensemble. Topics covered will include Nashville Number Chart reading and writing, music terminology and vocal harmonies as they apply to various styles of music.
ENMT 222                        ENMT Internship II
2 Credit Hours
This course will provide the student a real world, hands-on working situation. The student will be placed in an actual work environment for a minimum of 160 hours over a period of four weeks to gain on-the-job experience.

ENMT 223                        Introduction to Lighting & Rigging
4 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to the technical aspects of concert lighting and rigging. Topics covered will include basic design, color theory, types of instruments, power distribution, proper safety practices, connections, focus and control of instruments, and digital lighting and rigging applications.

ENMT 233                        Electronics Technology II
3 Credit Hours
This course will focus on how to apply electronic and electrical trouble shooting techniques, math concepts, formulas, and safety practices, along with exploring digital circuits and digital technology. Students should gain the basic skills and theory for trouble shooting equipment without a schematic or wiring diagram.
Prerequisite: ENMT 114 Electronics Technology I

ENMT 243                        Concert Lighting & Rigging
3 Credit Hours
This course further develops the technical aspects of concert lighting and rigging. Topics covered will include power distribution, safety practices, connections, lighting grids and trusses, DMX control, digital and conventional lighting and rigging.  
Prerequisite: ENMT 223 Introduction to Lighting and Rigging

ENMT 253                    Video Production II
3 Credit Hours 
This course is designed to build upon the fundamental skills of video production and editing. Topics include documentary film making advanced cinematography, lighting, post-production workflow, file management techniques, and advanced editing techniques.
Prerequisite - ENMT 123 Introduction to Video Production.

ENMT 263                    Audio for Video
3 Credit Hours 
This course is designed to instruct students on the fundamentals of recording audio on a film set. Topics include recording automatic dialog replacement, creating sound design for film, audio editing and mixing techniques for film, 5.1 surround sound mixing and file management.

ENMT 273                    Multi-track Recording I
3 Credit Hours
 This course covers additional concepts and technical skills required in recording studio procedures. Topics covered will include digital recording, special effects, production techniques, engineer and studio record keeping, studio scheduling, studio maintenance, and post production techniques.
Prerequisite: Introduction to Audio or permission of instructor.

ENMT 283                    Multi-track Recording II
3 Credit Hours 
This course covers additional concepts and technical skills required in recording studio procedures. Topics covered will include digital recording, special effects, production techniques, engineer and studio record keeping, studio scheduling, studio maintenance, and post production techniques.
Prerequisite: Multi-track Recording I or permission of instructor
EQ 103                             Equine Science
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to introduce students to the history, breeds, anatomy, selection, genetics, reproduction, nutrition, and management of the horse.

EQ 104                              Horsemanship I
4 Credit Hours
This course covers basic principles and techniques of western riding, horse care, management, and equine training. It focuses on safety and basic to intermediate horsemanship maneuvers and techniques.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

EQ 104                               Horsemanship
4 Credit Hours
This course covers basic principles and techniques of western riding, horse care, management, and equine training. It focuses on safety and basic to intermediate horsemanship maneuvers and techniques.

EQ 112                               Equine Evaluation
2 Credit Hours
This course examines equine performance related to conformation, environment, heredity, and training. It focuses on selection and function based on conformation and athletic performance.

EQ 113                              Equine Management
3 Credit Hours
This course provides an introduction to all aspects of equine management including: facility management, health care, selection, nutrition, and maintenance.

EQ 113A                           Equine Anatomy
3 Credit Hours
This course examines the basic structure of the horse and provides an in-depth study of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, and cardiovascular systems.
 
EQ 113B                           Equine Nutrition
2 Credit Hours
This course provides an in-depth study of equine absorption, digestion, metabolism, excretion, and function of nutrients and examines nutritional requirements for growth, maintenance, and performance.

EQ 114                              Horsemanship II
4 Credit Hours
This course presents principles and techniques of western riding, horse care, management, and equine training. It covers safety and intermediate to advanced horsemanship techniques and maneuvers.
Prerequisite: Horsemanship I or Consent of Instructor

EQ 123                               Equine Business
3 Credit Hours
This course examines business management practices essential to the planning and operation of equine businesses, facilities, and operations. It focuses on management, marketing, sales, and record keeping.

EQ 123A                            Performance Training I
3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the fundamentals of performance horse training. It covers various methods, techniques, and philosophies of training horses to participate in performance events. This course consists of hands-on application of these techniques, methods, and philosophies.
Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor

EQ 191-296 (A-Z)            Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

EQ 213                              Equine Sales and Marketing
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to prepare students with marketing and sales skills for various equine enterprise types. Specific emphasis will be placed on the development of effective advertisements, market research, sales strategy, pricing, and other components of a successful market plan.

EQ 213A                          Performance Training II
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover immediate to advanced techniques, methods, and philosophies of training performance horses. It consists of hands-on application of these techniques, methods, and philosophies.
Prerequisite: Performance Training I or Consent of Instructor

EQ 213C                        Performance Training III
4 Credit Hours 
This course focuses on specialized horse training techniques and methods designed to allow students individually specific horse training opportunities.
Prerequisite: Performance Training III or permission of Instructor

EQ 223A                          Performance Training IV
3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on advanced specialized horse training techniques and methods. It offers students individually specific horse training opportunities. 
Prerequisite: Performance Training II or permission of Instructor.
FYEX 1120                    College Success
3 Credit Hours
This is an introduction to college life and surveys topics from policies and procedures to career exploration. This course outlines strategies the student can use to achieve a successful college experience. The emphasis is on the attainment of superior personal and academic skills. (This class will not count as a Social and Behavioral Sciences requirement in the General Education core requirements.)

GEOG 1120                       World Regional Geography
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed as an introductory geographic survey arranged around the following major regions: United States and Canada, Latin America and the Caribbean, Europe, Northern Eurasia, Central Asia and Afghanistan, The Middle East and North Africa, Africa-South of the Sahara, South Asia, East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Australia, New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands.  Emphasis is placed upon an analysis of the natural environment, cultural environment, population status, economic development, and potentials.

GG 191-296 (A-Z)             Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
GEOL 1110C                       Physical Geology
4 Credit Hours
This course will study earth materials including the origin of minerals and rocks, erosion and deposition, earth movements and mountain building, volcanism, earth resources, oceans, and meteorology. Concurrent enrollment in GEOL1110Z (laboratory) is required.

GEOL 2110C                       Historical Geology
4 Credit Hours
This course will include a chronological study of the history and development of life on earth. Topics will include the formation of the oceans and atmospheres, fossils, and evolution of dinosaurs, and animal life. Concurrent enrollment in GE 124L or GEOL 2110Z (laboratory) is required.

GEOL 2130C                       Introduction to Meteorology
4 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the science of the atmosphere by following weather in real time via the internet. This course provides the student with background information on the properties of the atmosphere, the scientific principles that govern weather and climate, the interactions between the atmosphere and the other components of the Earth system, and the implications of those interactions for humankind.
Concurrent enrollment in GE 214L or GEOL 2130Z (laboratory) is required.

GEOL 2120C                        Introduction to Oceanography
4 Credit Hours
This course covers aspects of geology, chemistry, physics, climatology, environmental science, and biology as they apply to the oceans. Oceanography explores the ocean in the Earth system with special emphasis on the flow and transformation of weather and energy into and out of the ocean, the physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, marine life and its adaptations, interactions between the ocean and the other components of the Earth system, and the human/societal impacts on and response to those interactions. This course provides the foundation needed for students to intelligently participate in important societal discussions that involve environmental issues. Concurrent enrollment in GEOL 2120Z (laboratory) is required. (Previously GE 224)
 
GE 191-296 (A-Z)               Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
HM 101                              Safety and Hazardous Materials
1 Credit Hour
This course will introduce the student to the proper management of hazardous material encountered in the automotive environment. The student will gain an
understanding of the Hazard Communication Regulation. Students will learn how to utilize a Material Safety Data Sheet in order to identify, handle, store, and dispose of hazardous materials. They will be introduced to basic first aid and response to spills or exposure in their work environment. Use of the proper personal protective equipment will be covered. Other safety topics including right-to-know laws will be covered.

HM 191-296 (A-Z)            Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses.
The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
HIST 1110                 United States History I
3 Credit Hours   
The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from the pre-colonial period to the immediate aftermath of the Civil War. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies. (Previously HI 113)

 

HIST 1120                 United States History II
3 Credit Hours 
The primary objective of this course is to serve as an introduction to the history of the United States from reconstruction to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of the United States within the context of world societies.  (Previously HI 123)

 

HIST 1150                 Western Civilization I
3 Credit Hours 
This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from ancient times to the early modern era. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization. (Previously HI 213)

 

HIST 1160                 Western Civilization II
3 Credit Hours  
This course is a chronological treatment of the history of the western world from the early modern era to the present. The elements of this course are designed to inform students on the major events and trends that are essential in the understanding of the development of western civilization within the context of world societies. Selective attention will be given to "non-western" civilizations which impact and influence the development of "western" civilization. (Previously HI 223)

 

HIST 1185               History of Lost Civilizations
This course introduces students to a comparative analysis of lost civilizations of both what is deemed the "old" world and "new" world, including the Sumerians, Hittites, Minoans, Mycenaeans, Amazonians, Atlantis, Etruscans, Mohenjo-Daro, Mesoamerican, Roanoke, Mali, and Dong Son. (Previously HI 123B)

 

HI 191-296 (A-Z)        Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
HE 113                                Introduction to Nutrition
3 Credit Hours
This course provides an introduction to the principles of basic nutrition and the relationship of nutrition to health.

HE 191-296                       Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
NOTE: The following courses are taught through the Southeastern New Mexico Regional Law Enforcement Training Academy. These courses will substitute for the criminal justice courses (CJ) as indicated when applying for the certificate in Law Enforcement, the Associate of Arts, or Associates of Applied Science degrees. However, the criminal justice courses (CJ) will not substitute for the law enforcement courses (LA), since the LA courses have additional components not in the CJ courses to meet the requirements for licensure by the state of New Mexico as a peace officer.
 
LA 111                                First Aid and CPR for Public Safety
1 Credit Hour
This course provides instruction and certification in basic First Aid / CPR knowledge, skills, and procedures designed to render care for the sick or injured. This instruction is specific to first responders while in a law enforcement and / or corrections capacity.

LA 112                               Physical Training and Wellness for Law Enforcement Officers
2 Credit Hours
This course is designed to enhance the basic police officer’s level of fitness, as well as to develop an understanding of wellness as it relates to police work and to develop an appreciation for a conditioned state of well-being. This class will include demonstration, discussion, and participation. This class will incorporate periodic fitness assessments, strength, cardiovascular, and flexibility training. Additionally, concepts in nutrition and safety will be covered. The student will be required to perform satisfactorily on the final fitness tests and obstacle/agility courses for state certification as a law enforcement officer. Co-requisite: Enrollment in the Law Enforcement Academy

LA 113                              Introduction to Criminal Justice (same as CJ 113)
3 Credit Hours
This course will cover the development and philosophy of criminal justice in a democratic society and an introduction to agencies involved in the administration of criminal justice. Discussion will include the goals of the police, history of the criminal justice system, how the system functions within the context of government to protect individual rights as well as Constitutionally imposed restrictions on the system.

LA 113B                          Substantive Criminal Law (same as CJ 113B)
3 Credit Hours
This course will explain the history of criminal law, the principles of criminal procedure, and the essential components of constitutional, statutory, and common law.

LA 113E                          Introduction to the Courts (same as CJ 113E)
3 Credit Hours
This course will explain the history of the courts, as well as the organization, structure, and jurisdiction of the judicial system.

LA  113P                        Police & Society (same as CJ 113P)
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction in the study of law enforcement and policing in America. It will explore diversity and critically evaluate the direction and trends in modern police agencies.  The student will become familiar with the names, phrases, and concepts that are routinely used by those involved in the study of crime and the workings of the criminal justice system.

LA 114                           Custody Control, Chemical Agents and Officer Safety
4 Credit Hours
This course will cover procedures (principles, concepts, medical implication and practical application) for custody and control and use of chemical agents in a law enforcement environment. Also covered will be academic and practical application regarding officer safety including day and night traffic stops, arrest situations, and handcuffing.

LA 121                           Case Preparation and Presentation
1 Credit Hour
This course provides basic knowledge in the nature of technical writing as it applies to police reports and documentation. The course will also provide the student with clear and concise techniques and procedures to effectively prepare for and testify in civil and / or criminal court proceedings. 

LA 123F                        Traffic Law & Accident Investigation (same as CJ 123F)
3 Credit Hours
This course will review theories and basic techniques of accident investigation: what the vehicle shows, examination of the roadway, recording and preservation of skid mark evidence, speed estimates, reconstruction of the accident scene, diagram and map making, photographing the accident scene, background investigation, court testimony and study of the New Mexico vehicle code.

LA 123P                        Law Enforcement Patrol Procedures (same as CJ 123P)
3 Credit Hours
This is a course involving basic patrol concepts including high risk and unknown risk patrol tactics, handling special needs individuals, domestic violence, disorderly conduct, public disturbances, intoxication, vehicle/foot patrol and observation. Also, topics covered include basic techniques for arrest/custody, supervision, and transportation of prisoners, handling crimes in progress, preliminary investigations, conduct at crime scenes, and officer survival.

LA 191-296                  Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
 
LA 213A                      Criminal Investigation (same as CJ 213A)
3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the fundamentals of criminal investigation. It includes conduct at crime scenes, collection and preservation of evidence, interviews and interrogations, crime scene photography and sketching, and report writing.
 
LA 213B                      Criminal Procedure (same as CJ 213B)
3 Credit Hours
This course will concentrate on substantive criminal law, general rules, principles, and doctrines of criminal liability in the United States; and classifications of crimes against persons, property, and the public welfare.
MATH 1130            Survey of Mathematics
3 Credit Hours
This Course will develop students' ability to work with and interpret numerical data, to apply logical and symbolic analysis to a variety of problems, and/or model phenomena with mathematical or logical reasoning. Topics include financial mathematics used in everyday life situations, statistics, and optional topics from a wide array of authentic contexts. (CCNS) Prerequisite: TS 113F or equivalent or appropriate score on placement test.

 

MATH 1215              Intermediate Algebra
3 Credit Hours
A study of linear and quadratic functions, and an introduction to polynomial, absolute value, rational, radical, exponential, and logarithmic functions. A development of strategies for solving single-variable equations and contextual problems. Prerequisite: TS 113F or equivalent or appropriate score on a placement test.

 

MATH 1220              College Algebra
3 Credit Hours  
The study of equations, functions and graphs, reviewing linear and quadratic functions, and concentrating on polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic functions. Emphasizes algebraic problem-solving skills and graphical representation of functions. This college algebra course is designed for pre-engineering, mathematics, and science majors. (Previously MA 113) Prerequisite: MA 113A or MATH 1215 or equivalent or appropriate score on placement test.

 

MATH 1230              Trigonometry
3 Credit Hours
A study of plane trigonometry including the definitions of the fundamental trig functions using right angle triangle and unit circle approaches. Trig functions of any real number will be evaluated and the functions graphed along with their transformations. Trigonometric identities will be developed and demonstrated including multiple angle identities and identities developed from them. Inverse Trigonometric functions will be developed and used to solve trigonometric equations. Trigonometric applications will be solved using right angle trigonometry and the laws of sines and cosines. Trigonometric methods will be applied to complex numbers and the use of 2D vectors and vector dot products. (Previously MA 123) Prerequisite: MA 113 or MATH 1220

 

MATH 1350              Statistics
3 Credit Hours  
This course discusses the fundamentals of descriptive and inferential statistics. Students will gain introductions to topics such as descriptive statistics, probability and basic probability models used in statistics, sampling and statistical inference, and techniques for the visual presentation of numerical data. These concepts will be illustrated by examples from a variety of fields. (Previously MA 113B) Prerequisite: MA 113A, or MA 113, or MATH 1220, or MATH 1215, or equivalent or appropriate score on placement test.

 

MATH 1510              Calculus I
3 Credit Hours
Introduces the intuitive, numerical and theoretical concepts of limits, continuity, differentiation and integration. Includes the study of extrema, curve sketching, and applications involving algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions. Designed for mathematics, science and engineering majors. (Previously MA 144) Prerequisite: MA 113 or MATH 1220 or MA 123 or MATH 1230

 

MATH 1520              Calculus II
3 Credit Hours
Continues course of study begun in Calculus I. Covers integration techniques, numerical integration, improper integrals, some differential equations, sequences, series and applications. (Previously MA 154) Prerequisite: MA 144 or MATH 1510

 

 

MA 113C                  Technical Mathematics I
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed for the student majoring in a vocational / technical field. It includes a brief review of whole numbers, decimals, and fractions followed by fundamental operations of algebra, linear equations, ratio, proportions, variations, percent, basic geometry, unit conversions, metric system, and applications in the technical fields.

 

MA 191-296 (A-Z)      Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
ME 111                              Medical Terminology I
1 Credit Hour
This course is an introduction to medical terminology with an emphasis on elements of medical terms, standard medical abbreviations, spelling, and an appreciation of the logical method found in medical terminology.

ME 121                               Medical Terminology II
1 Credit Hour
This course is a continuation of ME 111 and uses a systematic approach to learn medical terms, standard medical abbreviations, and spelling.
Prerequisite: ME 111, Medical Terminology I

ME 191-296 (A-Z)              Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
MUSC 1130                      Music Appreciation: Western Music
3 Credit Hours
This course explores the ideas of music in society and its cultural relevance.  The elements of sound and music and stylistic explorations of four major periods in western art and music will be explored.
 
MU 112D                           Instrument I
2 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of MU 101 Private Instrument and is designed for non-music and music majors whose interest or concentration of study is an orchestral or other instrument. The student’s proficiency level will be assessed and an individualized program of study will be developed. This is a performance-based course.
Prerequisite: MU 101 Private Instrument or permission of the instructor

MU 122C                           Instrument II
2 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of MU 112 Instrument I and is designed for non-music and music majors whose interest or concentration of study is an orchestral or other instrument. This is a performance-based course.
Prerequisite: MU 112D Instrument I or permission of the instructor

MU 131C                          College and Community Band
1 Credit Hour
This is a performance-oriented course designed for both college and members of the community. Various styles of music are introduced with emphasis in concert band idioms. Included in the course will be a study of instrumental tone, intonation, technique, balance, interpretation, and musical effects.


MU 212C                          Instrument III
2 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of MU 122C Instrument II and is designed for non-music and music majors whose interest or concentration of study is an orchestral or other instrument. This is a performance-based course.
Prerequisite: MU 122C Instrument II

MU 222C                          Instrument IV
2 Credit Hours
This course is a continuation of MU 212C Instrument III and is designed for non-music and music majors whose interest or concentration of study is an orchestral or other instrument. This is a performance-based course.
Prerequisite: MU 212C Instrument III
 
MU 191-296 (A-Z)           Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
NU 105                               Nurse Aide I
5 Credit Hours
This course is approved by New Mexico Department of Health, Health Facility Licensing and Certification Bureau. The course is part one of a two-part program and I designed to introduce to students the necessary knowledge and skills to deliver responsible and safe basic health care for residents in nursing and long-term care Facilities under the supervision of a qualified registered nurse. The course will involve an on-campus lab component as well as an off-campus clinical experience of up to 24 hours or more.

NU 105A                           Nurse Aide II
5 Credit Hours
This course is approved by New Mexico Department of Health, Health Facility Licensing and Certification Bureau. Students must meet eligibility requirements before enrolling in this course. The course is part two of a two-part program and involves an on-campus lab component as well as an off-campus clinical experience of up to 24 hours or more. Students will deliver responsible and safe basic health care for residents in nursing and long-term care facilities under the supervision of a qualified registered nurse.
Prerequisite: NU 105 Nurse Aide I

NU 105B                            Nurse Aide Certification Course
5 Credit Hours
This course provides instruction in the roles and responsibilities of the Nursing Assistant. Body structure and function, infection prevention, nutrition, principles of growth and development, safety in healthcare, home health care, and care of the older person are some of the topics emphasized. Instruction and practice of basic patient care skills required for Nursing Assistants is provided. Skills practiced include patient assistance with activities of daily living, personal care, transfer and positioning, vital sign measurement, intake and output measurement, restorative care, and communication. Students will practice supervised basic patient care in a clinical setting prior to completion of the program. The student must successfully meet all objectives of the course; pass computerized exams, laboratory skills performance and the clinical experience to be eligible for course completion. There are specific clinical requirements that must be completed prior to beginning the course. At the completion of this certificate, students are eligible to take the New Mexico State certification exam to become a Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA). The Nurse Aide Certification Course is a five credit hour course with lab component. (45 didactic and 80 clinical/lab hours).
Prerequisite: Accuplacer English score of 105 and Math score of 95.

NU 104                            Pathophysiology for Nursing
4 Credit Hours
Human Pathophysiology concepts of adaptation and alteration in function and structure across the life span and their implications for nursing practice.
Prerequisites: BI 214A/BIOL 2210C Human Anatomy & Physiology I and BI 224A/BIOL 2225C Human Anatomy & Physiology II
NU 113A                           Introduction to Nursing Concepts
3 Credit Hours   (NMNC 1110)
This course introduces the nursing student to the concepts of nursing practice and conceptual learning. Knowledge is integrated from pre-requisite and co-requisite courses into a conceptual learning model and applied to select nursing concepts. The student defines personal values, beliefs, and attitudes about health and wellness. This course provides opportunities for the student to describe the importance of identifying patient safety issues, the roles and values of the nurse and members of the health care team, and specific standards/regulations that apply to nursing practice.
Prerequisite:  Admission into the nursing program.
Corequisites:  Principles of Nursing Practice, NU 113B

NU 114                               Principles of Nursing Practice
4 Credit Hours   (NMNC 1135)
This course introduces the nursing student to the application of concepts through clinical skills in seminar, laboratory, and/or the clinical setting. The course focuses on the principles of communication, assessment, safety, and specific nursing interventions including accurate calculation, measurement, and administration of medications.  Different types and characteristics of communication used in professional practice are described. The student applies the concepts learned in Level I nursing courses to the care of the patient and implements the principles of safety during the performance of nursing skills in patient-based scenarios.
Prerequisite:  Admission into the nursing program

NU 123                               Health & Illness Concepts I
3 Credit Hours   (NMNC 1210)
This course focuses on health and illness concepts across the lifespan.  The scope, risk factors, physiologic processes, attributes, and clinical management of the concepts of homeostasis/regulation, sexuality/reproduction, protection/movement, and emotional processes are included in the course content. Exemplars, evidence-based practices, collaborative care, healthcare standards, nursing informatics/technologies, and care resources associated with the concepts of the course are discussed.  Normal physiology and healthy adaptations of the patient are integrated into the concept/exemplar content.
Prerequisites:  NU 113A Introduction to Nursing Concepts, NU 113B Principles of Nursing Practice.
Corequisites:  NU 123A Health Care Participant, NU 123B Nursing Pharmacology, NU 124A Assessment and Health Promotion.

NU 123A                           Health Care Participant
3 Credit Hours   (NMNC 1220)
This course introduces the nursing student to the attributes of the health care participant as an individual, a family, or a community.  The student identifies personal values, beliefs, and attitudes regarding the health and wellness of the health care recipient. The role of nursing as related to the health of vulnerable populations and elimination of health disparities is included in course content.   Protective and predictive factors influencing the health of families, groups, communities, and populations are discussed.  Evidence-based practices guiding health-related teaching, counseling, screening, and outreach; disease and outbreak investigation; and health care referral and follow-up are explored. Information and communication technologies in preventive care are also included in the course content. This course provides opportunities for the student to examine the health care and emergency preparedness of the local community and the state of New Mexico. The student is given the opportunity to identify effective, efficient, economical, and equitable clinical prevention and population-focused interventions.
Prerequisite: NU 113A Introduction to Nursing Concepts, NU 114 Principles of Nursing Practice
Corequisites:  NU 123B Nursing Pharmacology, NU 124A Assessment and Health Promotion
NU 123B                           Nursing Pharmacology
3 Credit Hours (NMNC1230)
This course introduces the nursing student to pharmacological nursing practice across the lifespan utilizing a conceptual approach. The student identifies the nurse’s professional role related to pharmacotherapeutics in diverse populations.  Safety issues and minimization of risk potential associated with pharmacotherapeutics, complementary, and alternative medicines are discussed.  Evidence-based pharmacological and pathophysiological concepts are integrated to guide medication therapeutics. Health care system protocols, communication methods, and informatics related to pharmacotherapeutics are included in the course content. Common drug classes and the pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacotherapeutics associated with each class are included in this course.
Prerequisite: NU 113A Introduction to Nursing Concepts, NU 114 Principles of Nursing Practice
Corequisites:  NU 123 Health and Illness Concepts, NU 123A Health Care Participant, and NU 124A Assessment and Health Promotion

NU 124A                           Assessment & Health Promotion
4 Credit Hours  (NMNC 1235)
This course introduces the nursing student to assessment and health promotion for the health care participant as an individual, a family, or a community. This course utilizes seminar, laboratory, and/or clinical settings.  The student is given the opportunity to assess physical health, health/illness beliefs, values, attitudes, developmental level, functional ability, culture, and spirituality of the participant. The student also assesses family health including family health history, genetic health history, and environmental exposures to identify current and future health problems. Community health needs are identified through collaborative community assessment and evidence-based practice.  Assessment data is shared through communication with healthcare professionals to identify needed interventions. The role of the nurse as advocate for the health care recipient is explained.  The student is given the opportunity to analyze educational materials for literacy level.
Prerequisite:  NU 113A Introduction to Nursing Concepts, NU 114 Principles of Nursing Practice Corequisites: NU 123 Health and Illness Concepts, NU 123A Health Care Participant, and NU 123B Nursing Pharmacology

NU 203                               Health & Illness Concepts II
3 Credit Hours  (NMNC 2310)
This course focuses on health and illness concepts across the lifespan.  Concepts covered include oxygenation/hemostasis, homeostasis/regulation, protection/movement, and cognitive/behavioral processes.  The scope, risk factors, physiologic processes, attributes, and clinical management of the selected concepts are included in the course content.  Exemplars, evidence-based practices, collaborative care, healthcare standards, nursing informatics/technologies, and care resources associated with the concepts of the course are discussed.  Opportunities are provided for the student to apply selected health and illness concepts to the nursing care of health care recipients across the lifespan.
Prerequisites:  NU 123 Health and Illness Concepts I, NU 123A Health Care Participant, NU 123B Nursing Pharmacology, NU 124A Assessment and Health Promotion 
Corequisites: NU 213 Professional Nursing Concepts I, NU 214A Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions

NU 204A                           Health & Illness Concepts III
4 Credit Hours  (NMNC 2410)
This course focuses on health and illness concepts across the lifespan.  Concepts covered include homeostasis/regulation, oxygenation/hemostasis, protection/movement, and emotional processes.  The scope, risk factors, physiologic processes, attributes, and clinical management of the relationships between selected concepts/exemplars are discussed in the course content.  Exemplars, evidence-based practices, collaborative care, healthcare standards, nursing informatics/technologies, and care resources associated with the concepts/exemplars of the course are discussed. The roles of health care team members related to specific concepts/exemplars are differentiated. Opportunities are provided for the student to apply selected health and illness concepts to the nursing care of patients across the lifespan. 
Prerequisites:  NU 203 Health and Illness Concepts II, NU 213 Professional Nursing Concepts I, NU 214A Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions 
Corequisites: NU 214B Clinical Intensive I, NU 216 ADN Capstone

NU 212                             Professional Issues in PN Practice          

2 Credit Hours

This course offers an overview of professional issues related to the role of the practical nurse (PN) or licensed practical nurse (LPN). Students learn about the LPN role according to the New Mexico Nurse Practice Act. Scope of practice and legal accountability are reviewed. Other topics include ethical and legal responsibilities of the LPN role, delegation of duties, and the role of the LPN as part of a health care team. On successful completion of this course and Level 3 of the Nursing Program, students can submit a request to the NMBON to take the NCLEX-PN Prerequisites: Successful completion of L1 and L2 of the Nursing Program. Corequisites: All L3 courses (NU203, NU213 and NU214A (Students must successfully complete all courses in L3 including this course).

 
NU 213                               Professional Nursing Concepts I
3 Credit Hours  (NMNC 2310)
This course focuses on fundamental concepts for professional development, including selected professional attributes and care competencies. Ethical values, virtues, principles, and policies that guide the moral delivery of health care are examined. The relationship between the nurse’s interpretations of the health care recipient’s needs, concerns, and health problems and the nurse’s decisions are explored.  The delivery of quality nursing care and the factors that influence individuals, groups, and organizations to deliver quality nursing care are included in the content.  The effects of health care team member interactions in the delivery of care are discussed.
Prerequisites:  NU 123 Health and Illness Concepts I, NU 123A Health Care Participant, Nu 123B Nursing Pharmacology, NU 124A Assessment and Health Promotion 
Corequisites: NU 203 Health and Illness Concepts II, NU 214A Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions

NU 214A                           Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions
4 Credit Hours  (NMNC 2335)
The focus of this course is the provision of safe, evidence-based nursing care across the lifespan for patients with chronic conditions in a variety of settings. This course builds upon the student’s current knowledge of nursing concepts and utilizes a combination of laboratory and clinical settings. The student is given the opportunity to demonstrate ethical, safe, evidence-based nursing care for patients with chronic conditions. The student also demonstrates understanding of appropriate health care policy, finance, and regulatory environments effecting patients with chronic conditions. The student practices effective communication techniques with health care team members and patients with chronic conditions.  The student also demonstrates effective use of the nursing process and nursing informatics/technologies in the nursing care to patients with chronic conditions. Prerequisites:  NU 203 Health and Illness Concepts I, NU 123A Health Care Participant, NU 123B Nursing, Pharmacology, NU 124A Assessment and Health Promotion
Corequisites: NU 203 Health and Illness Concepts II, NU 213 Professional Nursing Concepts

NU 214B                           Clinical Intensive I
4 Credit Hours  (NMNC 2435)
This course is the first of two Level Four clinical courses in which the student will apply the curricular concepts in the care management of patients with acute conditions across the lifespan.  This course utilizes a combination of seminar, lab, and clinical. The student is given the opportunity to integrate nursing practice concepts into professional nursing practice and integrate diverse patient values into plans of care for patients with acute illness. The student interprets and analyzes system conditions and other factors that impact the quality and safety of nursing practice. An evidence-based approach is used in the delivery and evaluation of nursing care to acutely ill patients across the lifespan.  The student evaluates policies and procedures relative to the acute care setting and collaborates with the health care team regarding delivery of patient care.  The student also integrates the use of appropriate nursing informatics/technologies in the delivery of nursing care to acutely ill patients.
Prerequisites:  NU 203 Health and Illness Concepts II, NU 213 Professional Nursing Concepts I, NU 214A Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions 
Corequisites:  NU 204A Health and Illness Concepts III, NU 216 ADN Capstone

NU 216                               ADN Capstone
6 Credit Hours  (NMNC 2445)
This course is the second of two Level Four clinical courses.  This course prepares the student for entry-level nursing practice as an associate degree graduate. The focus of this course is management of individuals across the lifespan with chronic, acute, and select complex conditions. This course utilizes a combination of seminar, lab, and clinical.  The student is given the opportunity to integrate nursing practice concepts into professional nursing practice and integrate diverse patient values into plans of care for patients with acute illness.  The student interprets and analyzes system conditions and other factors that impact the quality and safety of nursing practice. An evidence-based approach is used in the delivery and evaluation of nursing care for patients across the lifespan. The student practices in accordance with policies and procedures of the assigned health care setting and collaborates with the health care team regarding delivery of patient care. The student also integrates the use of appropriate nursing informatics/technologies in the delivery of nursing care for assigned patients.
Prerequisites:  NU 203 Health and Illness Concepts II, NU 213 Professional Nursing Concepts I, NU 214A Care of Patients with Chronic Conditions. 
Corequisites:  NU 204A Health and Illness Concepts III, NU 214B Clinical Intensive I
PHIL 2230                         Philosophical Thought
3 Credit Hours  
In this course, students will grapple with some of the key questions of philosophy through the study of classical and contemporary thinkers. Students will become familiar with the perennial problems in subfields of philosophy such as metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics. They will learn to approach these problems both critically and sympathetically. (Previously PI 213)
 
PI 191-296 (A-Z)              Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
 
PY 111A                            Nautilus Conditioning
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that provides instruction for an isokinetic conditioning program that can develop muscular strength, muscular endurance, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance at a moderate pace. It also provides the student with new techniques in exercise conditioning that can make fitness enlightening and enjoyable.

PY 111C                            Techniques of Women’s Cross Country I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that provides instruction in and practice of basic cross country running techniques. This course is designed to increase cardiovascular and aerobic endurance of distance runners through distance training. It is set up to meet the needs of incoming freshmen.

PY 111D                            Techniques of Men’s Cross Country I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that provides instruction in and practice of basic cross country running techniques. This course is designed to increase cardiovascular and aerobic endurance of distance runners through distance training. It is set up to meet the needs of incoming freshman.

PY 111G                            Techniques of Volleyball I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for first semester freshmen so they can participate in the sport of volleyball. This course will provide individuals opportunities to develop skills, knowledge of rules, conditioning, and the ability to incorporate teamwork and integrity as it relates to volleyball. This is a one credit hour course.

PY 111H                           Fitness for Life
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that is required for most degree seeking students. The student will be introduced to all the concepts and components necessary for incorporating physical fitness into their current lifestyle and the benefits of lifelong physical activity.

PY 111L                             Circuit Weight Training
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that provides a moderate to high intensity workout program consisting of weight lifting and aerobic movement patterns, providing maximum fitness benefits in a minimum amount of time.

PY 113                                Introduction to Physical Education
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education theory course that provides instruction about the foundations of physical education, aims, objectives, scope, and general significance of physical education involving all age groups.

PY 121B                            Techniques of Volleyball II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for second semester freshmen so they can participate in the sport of volleyball. This course will provide individuals advanced opportunities to develop skills, knowledge of rules, conditioning, and the ability to incorporate teamwork and integrity as it relates to volleyball. This is a one credit hour course.

PY 121G                            Men’s Competitive Golf I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for second semester freshmen so they can participate in the sport of golf. The course will provide advanced opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, knowledge of rules, and conditioning for golf. It will also emphasize the importance of teamwork, honesty, and integrity as it relates to golf.

PY 121H                           Techniques of Women’s Basketball I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for entry level freshmen so they can participate in the sport of basketball. The course will provide opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, and proper conditioning for basketball. Various team building strategies will be implemented.

PY 121O                            Techniques of Women’s Cross Country II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that provides instruction in and practice of advanced cross country running techniques. This course is designed to increase cardiovascular and aerobic endurance of distance runners through distance training. It is set up to meet the needs of sophomores.

PY 121P                            Techniques of Men’s Cross Country II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that provides instruction in and practice of advanced cross country running techniques. This course is designed to increase cardiovascular and aerobic endurance of distance runners through distance training. It is set up to meet the needs of sophomores.

PY 121U                            Techniques of Men’s Basketball I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for entry level freshmen so that they can participate in the sport of basketball. The course will provide opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, and proper conditioning for basketball. Various team building strategies will be implemented.

PY 131A                            Techniques of Men’s Basketball II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for second semester freshmen so that they can participate in the sport of basketball. The course will provide advanced opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, and proper conditioning for basketball. Various team building strategies will be implemented.

PY 131B                             Techniques of Women’s Basketball II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for second semester freshmen so they can participate in the sport of basketball. The course will provide advanced opportunities for both the individuals to develop skills, techniques, and proper conditioning for basketball. Various team building strategies will be implemented.

PY 131C                             Techniques of Men’s Baseball I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that provides team orientation, individual assessment and goal setting, skills, techniques, rules and conditioning necessary to participate in intercollegiate men’s baseball. This class will meet the needs of the incoming freshmen.

PY 131D                            Techniques of Men’s Golf I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for entry level freshmen so they can participate in the sport of golf. The course will provide advanced opportunities for both the individual and the team to learn the rules of golf, to set goals, to improve motor skills, to improve techniques, and to focus on conditioning. It will also emphasize the importance of teamwork, honesty, and integrity as it relates to golf.

PY 131E                             Techniques of Rodeo I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education course designed for entry level freshmen students. Organizing a rodeo will be taught in this course. Students will have the responsibility of preparing for and physically working to conduct a National Intercollegiate Rodeo Association (NIRA). Skills, techniques, and proper conditioning which is necessary to be competitive in the sport of rodeo will be emphasized. All NIRA rodeo events will be addressed.

PY 131G                            Weight Training
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that introduces the basic techniques of weight training and proper conditioning. Knowledge of proper form and performance of individual exercises for various muscles and/or muscle groups will be taught.

PY 131T                            Athletic Training Practicum 1
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education practicum course that provides instruction for the entry level Athletic Training student. Hands-on education in the training room and athletic fields with emphasis on athletic training room procedures, practices, and basic taping is provided. This course has two components: the clinical assignments as well as mandatory weekly seminars in which educational modules will be discussed, demonstrated, and practiced.

PY 132T                            Athletic Training Practicum II
2 Credit Hours
This is a physical education practicum course that provides instruction as a continuation of PY 131T in which the first year student progresses with emphasis on medical services and advanced taping and wrapping techniques. The clinical assignment commitment is also expanded. This course also has the clinical and mandatory weekly seminar components. Prerequisite: PY 131T or consent of instructor

PY 141C                            Techniques of Men’s Baseball II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course that provides team orientation, individual assessment and goal setting, skills, techniques, rules and conditioning necessary to participate in intercollegiate men’s baseball. This class will meet the needs of the incoming freshmen.

PY 141D                            Techniques of Men’s Golf II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for sophomores so they can participate in the sport of golf. The course will provide advanced opportunities for both the individual and the team to learn the rules of golf, to set goals, to improve motor skills, to improve techniques, and to focus on conditioning. It will also emphasize the importance of teamwork, honesty, and integrity as it relates to golf.

PY 141E                             Techniques of Rodeo II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education course designed for second semester freshmen so that they can participate in competitive rodeo. This course will provide additional opportunity for students to advance their skills, techniques, and conditioning in their individual rodeo event. All NIRA rodeo events will be addressed.

PY 141T                            Techniques of Women’s Indoor / Outdoor Track & Field I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed to develop, improve, and maintain individual and team indoor / outdoor track skills. Techniques and conditioning needed to compete at a collegiate level will be taught. This class is set up to meet the needs of incoming freshmen.

PY 141U                            Techniques of Men’s Indoor / Outdoor Track & Field I
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed to develop, improve, and maintain individual and team indoor / outdoor track skills. Techniques and conditioning needed to compete at a collegiate level will be taught. This class is set up to meet the needs of incoming freshmen.

PY 211B                             Techniques of Volleyball III
This is a physical education activity course designed for first semester sophomore so they can participate in the sport of volleyball. This course will provide individuals advanced opportunities to develop skills, knowledge of rules, conditioning, and the ability to incorporate teamwork and integrity as it relates to volleyball. This is a one credit hour course.

PY 221B                             Techniques of Volleyball IV
This is a physical education activity course designed for second semester sophomore so they can participate in the sport of volleyball. This course will provide individuals advanced opportunities to develop skills, knowledge of rules, conditioning, and the ability to incorporate teamwork and integrity as it relates to volleyball. This is a one credit hour course.

PY 211C                             Techniques of Men’s Baseball III
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed to develop, improve, and maintain individual and team baseball skills. Advanced techniques and conditioning needed to compete at a collegiate level will be taught. This class is set up to meet the needs of first semester sophomores.

PY 211E                             Intermediate Golf
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed to reinforce basic fundamentals of golf and increase knowledge of how the game is to be played. The intermediate golf student can develop a basic knowledge of golf ball flight laws and acquire an understanding of the rules of golf.

PY 211K                            Conditioning Free Weights
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed to assist students with the knowledge and basic fundamentals of conditioning and strength training by using free weights. Individual weight training routines and other conditioning will be prescribed.

PY 213                                Health Education
3 Credit Hours
This is a physical education theory course that provides instruction of the physical, mental, and social health issues of our modern society. It examines critical issues involving personal, family, community, regional, and world health problems.
 

PY 213B                            First Aid & CPR
3 Credit Hours
This course teaches standard first aid and prevention of accidents; first aid for injuries and disorders, CPR skills and techniques for adults, children, and infants; and the proper use of defibrillator. This course can prepare students to successfully pass an official certification test.

PY 221C                            Techniques of Men’s Baseball IV
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed to develop, improve, and maintain individual and team baseball skills. Advanced techniques and conditioning needed to compete at a collegiate level will be taught. This class is set up to meet the needs of second semester sophomores.

PY 221G                            Men’s Competitive Golf II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for second semester sophomores so they can participate in the sport of golf. The course will provide advanced opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, knowledge of rules, and conditioning for golf. It will also emphasize the importance of teamwork, honesty, and integrity as it relates to golf.

PY 221H                            Techniques of Women’s Basketball III
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for sophomores so they can participate in the sport of basketball. The course will provide advanced opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, and proper conditioning for basketball. Various team building strategies will be implemented.

PY 221U                            Techniques of Men’s Basketball III
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for sophomores so that they can participate in the sport of basketball. The course will provide opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, and proper conditioning for basketball. Various team building strategies will be implemented.

PY 223                                Theory of Coaching Basketball
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of the theory, organization, and planning of practice in the coaching of basketball.

PY 223B                             Theory of Coaching Baseball
3 Credit Hours
This course is a physical education course designed to teach the administration, organization, management, and instructional skills necessary in coaching a successful high school or college baseball program.

PY 231A                            Techniques of Men’s Basketball IV
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for second semester sophomores so that they can participate in the sport of basketball. The course will provide advanced opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, and proper conditioning for basketball. Various team building strategies will be implemented.

PY 231B                             Techniques of Women’s Basketball IV
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed for second semester sophomores so they can participate in the sport of basketball. The course will provide advanced opportunities for individuals to develop skills, techniques, and proper conditioning for basketball. Various team building strategies will be implemented.

PY  231E                            Techniques of Rodeo III
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education course designed for sophomores. In this course, students will use their leadership skills to organize and produce a NIRA rode. They will be assigned a particular event and provided an opportunity to develop their skills, techniques, and proper conditioning, which are necessary to be competitive. All NIRA rodeo events will be addressed.

PY 231T                             Athletic Training Practicum III
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education practicum course for the second year athletic training student. Emphasis of educational modules is placed on therapeutic techniques and procedures. Clinical assignment requirements are expanded past the requirements of first year athletic training students. The course requires the clinical and mandatory weekly seminar components, in which educational modules are discussed, demonstrated, and practiced.

PY 232T                             Athletic Training Practicum IV
2 Credit Hours
This is a physical education practicum course that provides a continuation of PY 231T, in which second year athletic training students progress with educational modules that emphasize therapeutic exercise techniques. This course requires both a clinical assignment and mandatory weekly seminar components in which educational modules will be discussed, demonstrated, and practiced. Prerequisite: PY 231T or consent of instructor

PY  241E                            Techniques of Rodeo IV
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education course designed for second semester sophomores so that they can participate in competitive rodeo. This course will provide additional opportunity for students to advance their skills, techniques, and conditioning in their individual rodeo event. All NIRA rodeo events will be addressed.

PY  241T                            Techniques of Women’s Indoor / Outdoor Track & Field II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed to develop, improve, and maintain individual and team indoor / outdoor track skills. Advanced techniques and conditioning needed to compete at a collegiate level will be taught. This class is set up to meet the needs of sophomore students.

PY  241U                           Techniques of Men’s Indoor / Outdoor Track & Field II
1 Credit Hour
This is a physical education activity course designed to develop, improve, and maintain individual and team indoor / outdoor track skills. Advanced techniques and conditioning needed to compete at a collegiate level will be taught. This class is set up to meet the needs of sophomore students.
 
PHED 1830                       Running: Walking & Jogging 
1 Credit Hour
This course is a physical education activity course.  The primary purpose of this course is to introduce novice exercisers to the benefits of walking and jogging for the enhancement of health and fitness. Information on new trends and topics of fitness will be covered and individual walking and jogging programs will be established and performed throughout the semester.
 

PY 191-296 (A-Z)              Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

PHYS 1115C                    Survey of Physics 
4 Credit Hours
This is a survey of mechanics, electricity/magnetism, and modern physics. This course is focused for the non-science student. The conceptual aspects of physics will be explored, as well as the famous scientists and their theories. A minimum amount of mathematics will be used in the course. Real world experiments and simple experiments will make the concepts clearer to the student. This course is for non-science majors. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1115Z (laboratory) is required.
 
PHYS 1131                         Technical Physics
3 Credit Hours
This course covers the principles of mechanics, heat, and electricity as applied to automotive technology. This course is designed for students in the ASEP (GM), ASSET (FM), and Automotive Technology (AT) training programs and does not count as a lab science course.

PHYS 1230C                     Algebra-based Physics I
4 Credit Hours 
An algebra-based treatment of Newtonian mechanics. Topics include kinematics and dynamics in one and two dimensions, conservation of energy and momentum, rotational motion, equilibrium, and fluids. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1230Z (laboratory) is required. (Previously PH 114)
Prerequisites: MA 113 and 123, or MATH 1220 and 1230, or consent of instructor

PHYS 1240C                   Algebra-based Physics II
4 Credit Hours 
The second half of a two-semester algebra-based introduction to Physics. This course covers electricity, magnetism and optics. (Previously PH 124)  Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1240Z (laboratory) is required.  Prerequisite: PH 114 or PHYS 1230C
 
PHYS 1310C                   Calculus-based Physics I
4 Credit Hours 
A calculus level treatment of classical mechanics and waves, which is concerned with the physical motion concepts, forces, energy concepts, momentum, rotational motion, angular momentum, gravity, and static equilibrium. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1310Z (laboratory) is required. (Previously PH 214)
Prerequisite: MA 144, MATH 1510, or consent of instructor
 
PHYS 1320C                   Calculus-based Physics II
4 Credit Hours 
A calculus level treatment of classical electricity and magnetism. Concurrent enrollment in PHYS 1320Z (laboratory) is required. (Previously PH 224)
Prerequisite: PH 214 or PHYS 1310C
 
PH 191-296 (A-Z)          Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
POLS 1120                        American National Government
3 Credit Hours
This course explains the role of American national government, its formation and principles of the Constitution; relation of state to the national government; political parties and their relationship to interest groups. This course also explains the structure of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously GO 213)
PSYC 1110                Introduction to Psychology
3 Credit Hours  
This course will introduce students to the concepts, theories, significant findings, methodologies, and terminology that apply to the field of psychology. Previously (PS 113)

 

PSYC 2120                Developmental Psychology
3 Credit Hours
Study of human physical and psychological change and stability from a lifespan development perspective. (Previously PS 223B)

 

PSYC 2130                Adolescent Psychology
3 Credit Hours
Study of human physical and psychological change and stability from adolescence through the emerging adulthood years. (Previously PS 223) Prerequisite: PS 113 or PSYC 1110 Introduction to Psychology or consent of instructor

 

PSYC 2140                Child Psychology
3 Credit Hours
Study of human physical and psychological change and stability from conception through the late childhood years. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously PS 213)

 

PSYC 2230                Psychology of Adjustment
3 Credit Hours
This course focuses on the individual's adjustment to society, and the application of psychological principles to the understanding of adjustment. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously PS 213A)

 

PSYC 2390                Educational Psychology
3 Credit Hours
This course explores the practical application of psychological principles to teaching and learning. Contemporary issues in Education will also be discussed. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously PS 213F)

 

PSYC 2430                Human Relations
3 Credit Hours
This course is an introduction to the behavioral sciences as they apply to management. It includes a study of individual behavior as it relates to leadership traits, individual behavior in organizations, and related subjects of motivation and leadership. There is also a consideration of perceptions, attitudes, and values as they affect management decisions and actions. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously PS 213B)

 

PS 191-296 (A-Z)        Special Topics
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.


RELG 1110                        Introduction to World Religions
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces major world religions and the scholarly methods of the academic study of religion. Religions covered may include Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam and/or New Religious Movements. 
 
RE 191-296 (A-Z)             Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses.
The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
SIGN 1110                        American Sign Language I
3 Credit Hours
American Sign Language I is an introductory level language course in the language of the American Deaf Culture. Content includes ASL vocabulary and conversational skills; linguistic features of ASL; and skills in narrative/storytelling. In-class activities, comprehension and expressive examinations, narrative and storytelling assignments in addition to semester projects are venues for students to demonstrate their learning. In addition, Deaf Culture and Deaf Community issues are addressed. 

SIGN 1120                        American Sign Language II
3 Credit Hours
TAmerican Sign Language II is a continuation course that builds on concepts and skills developed in American Sign Language I.  Students gain further exposure to ASL structure and grammar, and Deaf Culture and the Deaf community.  Emphasis is on increasing students’ ability to comprehend other signers and express themselves with more elaboration when conversing or presenting in ASL. Prerequisite: SL 113, SIGN 1110, or approval of instructor

SIGN 2110                           American Sign Language III
This is an intermediate level course in American Sign Language (ASL). Expected areas of intermediate skill and knowledge development include: language comprehension and production, conversational use, narratives, ASL language features and further knowledge of and interaction with Deaf culture and the Deaf community. Prerequisite: SL 123 or SIGN 1120 American Sign Language II or instructor approval

SL 191-296 (A-Z)             Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
SO 191-296 (A-Z)            Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

SOCI 1110                        Introduction to Sociology
3 Credit Hours
This course will introduce students to the basic concepts and theories of sociology, as well as to the methods utilized in sociological research. The course will address how sociological concepts and theories can be utilized to analyze and interpret our social world, and how profoundly our society and the groups to which students belong influence them. Students will be given the opportunity to challenge their taken for granted or common-sense understandings about society, social institutions, and social issues. Special attention will also be paid to the intimate connections between their personal lives and the larger structural features of social life. In addition, the implications of social inequalities, such as race/ethnicity, gender, and social class will be central to the course’s examination of social life in the United States. (Previously SO 213)
 
SOCI 2130                        Introduction to Criminology
3 Credit Hours
Students will learn to understand and apply criminological theories that are produced within the field of sociology. These theories focus on how social structures, social contexts and particular kinds of social relationships influence the social activity of crime at both the micro and macro levels. Students will understand and analyze a variety of topics also pertinent to the study of crime, such as divergent definitions of crime, various correlates of criminal activities, criminal trends, and other key topics within the field of criminology. (Previously SO 223C)
 
SOCI 2250                        Sociology of Race and Ethnicity
3 Credit Hours
This class will examine race and ethnicity as social constructs, including the history of race and ethnic relations in the United States and how and why these constructs continue to play such important roles in the lives of U.S. peoples today. This course will also explore how other types of social stratification, such as class, gender, nationality, and sexual orientation, intersect with race and ethnicity. (Previously SO 233)

SOCI 2310                        Contemporary Social Problems
3 Credit Hours
This course studies the nature, scope, and effects of social problems and their solutions. The course will concentrate on sociological perspectives, theories, and key concepts when investigating problems, such as inequality, poverty, racism, alienation, family life, sexuality, gender, urbanization, work, aging, crime, war and terrorism, environmental degradation, and mass media. This course is designed to build students’ sociological understanding of how sociological approaches attempt to clarify various issues confronting contemporary life, as well as how sociologists view solutions to these problems. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously SO 223)


SO 223W                           Marriage and the Family
3 Credit Hours
This course is a study of the social context of the modern family. Emphasis is placed on parenting techniques, as well as psychological traits of a healthy family. Care is given to ascertain the social factors that influence mate selection and mate compatibility of relationships.

SPAN 1110                       Spanish I
4 Credit Hours 
Designed for students with little exposure to Spanish, this course develops basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and basic intercultural competence in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication at the Novice Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. During this course, students perform better and stronger in the Novice-Mid level while some abilities emerge in the Novice High range. This is an introductory course aimed at helping the student to communicate in Spanish in everyday familiar situations via recognition and production of practiced or memorized words, phrases, and simple sentences. (Previously SP 114)

SPAN 1120                       Spanish II
4 Credit Hours
Designed for students with some degree of exposure to Spanish in high school and/or at home, this course continues to develop basic listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills and basic intercultural competence in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational modes of communication based at the Novice High Level of 821Revised 9/25/2019proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines, although a few abilities may emerge in the Intermediate Low Level. Students in this course communicate in Spanish in familiar topics using a variety of words, phrases, simple sentences and questions that have been highly practiced and memorized. (Previously SP 124) Prerequisite:  SP 114 or SPAN 1110

SPAN 2110                       Spanish III
4 Credit Hours
This course is based on the integration of learning outcomes across Interpersonal, Interpretive, and Presentational Modes of Communication at the Intermediate Low Level of proficiency based on ACTFL guidelines. Students accomplish real-world communicative tasks in culturally appropriate ways as they gain familiarity with the target culture(s). This is an intermediate course aimed at helping the student to communicate in Spanish on familiar topics about self, others and everyday life at the same time that they recognize and handle short social interactions in interactions in everyday situations by asking and answering a variety of questions. (Previously SP 214)

SP 191-296 (A-Z)             Special Topics
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
COMM 1130                     Public Speaking
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces the theory and fundamental principles of public speaking, emphasizing audience analysis, reasoning, the use of evidence, and effective delivery. Students will study principles of communication theory and rhetoric and apply them in the analysis, preparation and presentation of speeches, including informative, persuasive, and impromptu speeches. This is a three (3) credit hour course. (Previously SE 123)
 
COMM 2120                     Interpersonal Communications
3 Credit Hours
This course provides an introduction to the study of interpersonal communication. Students will examine the application of interpersonal communication in personal and professional relationships. (Previously SE 113)
SE 133                               Introduction to Social Media
3 Credit Hours
This course develops knowledge and skills needed to understand, critique, and implement communication strategies using social media platforms. Course content focuses on professional and ethical use of social media. Topics includes: history of social media, critical analysis of relationships between social media and audiences, and relationships with traditional media, as well as using strategic communication in personal and professional settings. Students will develop projects for nonprofit organizations.

SE 191-296 (A-Z)             Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.
Transitional study courses cannot be used to satisfy graduation requirements.
 TS 103C                             Basic English Skills
3 Credit hours
This course is designed for students who need additional practice and background in basic English writing. The focus will be on helping students build competence in sentence mechanics and grammar. Skills developed in this course will provide a foundation needed to succeed in TS 113A Review of English I. This course cannot be substituted for any of the English requirements that lead to an associate degree. Enrollment in this course is based upon attainment of an appropriate score on a placement exam. The student must attain a grade of C or better to advance.

TS 113                                Developmental Reading
3 Credit hours
This course is designed to help students improve their reading skills. The goals of Developmental Reading include increased comprehension, vocabulary, and the student’s ability to remember what they have read. These skills and strategies provide a foundation needed to succeed in other college classes which require college-level textbook reading. The student must attain a grade of “C” or better to advance.

TS 113A                             Review of English I
3 Credit hours
This course is designed to assist those students whose ability level in writing requires practice and background development. It provides a review of grammar as well as the teaching of the fundamentals of idea development, support, and organization. This course cannot be substituted for any of the English requirements that lead to an associate degree. The student must attain a grade of C or better to advance.
Prerequisite: TS 103C Basic English Skills or attainment of an appropriate score on a placement exam

TS 113C                             Review of English II
3 Credit hours
This course is a continuation of TS 113A Review of English I and builds upon the foundations of usage and of sentence skills. Students will have the opportunity to strengthen their writing ability with the development, support, and organization of ideas using the five paragraph essay. This course cannot be substituted for any of the English requirements that lead to an associate degree. The student must attain a grade of C or better to advance.
Prerequisite: TS 113A Review of English I or attainment of an appropriate score on a placement test

TS 113E                             Basic Mathematics
3 Credit hours
This course develops the skills and concepts of arithmetic for students needing to strengthen their mathematical background. The course includes problem solving using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percentages, and variables. Coverage will also emphasize equation solving, finding areas and volumes, and the conversion of measures. This course will be taught using lecture, cooperative learning, demonstrations, supervised problem solving, and computer problem sets. This course does not fulfill the mathematics requirements for any of the associate degrees.

TS 113F                             Elementary Algebra
3 Credit hours
This course develops skills and concepts of algebra for students with little background in algebra. This course includes properties of real numbers, principles of addition and multiplication, solving linear inequalities, problems with two unknowns, graphing linear equations, exponent rules, scientific notation, operations on polynomials, factoring, compound inequalities and solving equalities and inequalities involving absolute value. This course does not fulfill the mathematics requirements for any of the associate degrees. Prerequisite: TS 113E or an appropriate score on a placement exam

TS 116                                 English as a Second Language I
6 Credit Hours
English as a Second Language I is designed to teach English to the non-native speaker and is based on the development of oral language skills and interaction strategies. Emphasis will be given to English pronunciation, grammar, and intonation, as well as to idiomatic English expression.

TS 123                                Reading Improvement
3 Credit Hours
This course is designed to help students improve their reading skills. The goals include increased comprehension, vocabulary, and the student’s ability to remember what they have read. These skills and strategies provide a foundation needed to succeed in other college classes which require college-level textbook reading. The student must attain a grade of “C” or better to advance. Prerequisite: TS 113 Developmental Reading or appropriate score on a placement exam

TS 126                                English as a Second Language II
6 Credit Hours
English as a Second Language II is a continuation of TS 116. The emphasis of this course is on academic writing skills and the grammar of written and spoken English.
Prerequisite: TS 116 English as a Second Language I
WE 113D                          Destructive Testing
3 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to a study of nomenclature, testing processes, equipment, and materials used in destructive testing. Studied procedures include guided bend, tension, impact, nick-break, and stress testing on ferrous and nonferrous material.
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: WE 114

WE 113E                            Basic Electrical Theory
3 Credit Hours
This course will provide students with the fundamentals of electrical terminology, units of measurement, voltage production methods, electrical symbols, battery terminology and hazards, voltage regulators, and transformers. It also covers circuits, electrical test equipment, and an introduction to National Electrical Code. Students will also be introduced to basic safety rules and regulations for electricians.

WE 113M                          Basic Metallurgy & Welding
3 Credit Hours
This course includes a study of ferrous and nonferrous metals from ore to the finished products. Emphasis is placed on metal alloys, heat-treating, hard surfacing, welding techniques, forging, foundry processes, and mechanical properties of metal including hardness, machinability, and ductility. Technical terms used in the various phases of metallurgy, from early history to classification of steel, are covered.
Prerequisite or co-requisite: WE 114 Introduction to Welding

WE 114                              Introduction to Welding
4 Credit Hours
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of welding, cutting, brazing, and soldering. Students will receive instruction in safety and operational procedures for Oxy-Acetylene welding and cutting equipment, arc welding equipment, and various other shop tools and equipment. Students will perform basic welding, cutting, brazing, and soldering exercises with Oxy-Acetylene and welding with Arc welding equipment.

WE 123S                           Job Estimating
3 Credit Hours
This class includes a study of the skills necessary to generate time, labor, and cost estimates for specific welding projects. Students will be required to identify, explain, and interpret weld symbols, identify structure shapes, calculate measurements, interpret blueprints, read detail drawings, and calculate dimensions and materials in order to produce accurate welding project cost estimates.

WE 124                              Advanced Welding
4 Credit Hours
This course includes shielded metal-arc welding in the horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Pipe welding layout procedures and arc welding of basic pipe joints are covered. Prerequisite: WE 114  Introduction to Welding

WE 191-296 (A-Z)            Special Topic
Special topics are offered occasionally and the selection is different every semester. Special Topic courses do not repeat material presented by regular semester courses. The purpose of special topics is to provide students with new, one-time, and developing courses. The specific topic is announced each semester.

WE 214                              Inert Gas Welding
4 Credit Hours
Students are required to practice inert gas welding processes on aluminum, mild steel, and stainless steel with Metal Inert Gas (MIG), which is also called Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), and Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) which is also called Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW).
Prerequisite:  WE 114 Introduction to Welding

WE 223N                          Non-Destructive Testing
3 Credit Hours
This course includes information on nomenclature, testing processes, equipment, and materials used in Non-Destructive Testing (NDT). Procedures include visual, ultrasound, dye-penetrate, and magnetic particle testing on ferrous and nonferrous material. Explanations of radiographic (x-ray), hydrostatic, and pneumatic processes are included.
Prerequisite or Co-Requisite: WE 114 Introduction to Welding

WE 223P                           Pipe Welding
3 Credit Hours
This course includes shielded metal-arc welding in the horizontal, vertical, and overhead positions. Industrial pipe layout and fabrication and arc welding of basic pipe joints are covered. Students will practice cutting with a plasma cutting torch and welding in different positions from IG through 6G. 
Prerequisite: WE 114 Introduction to Welding

WE 224                               Advanced Theory & Practice
4 Credit Hours
This class is the capstone course for the NMJC welding program. Students are required to design and construct projects using several approved welding process to demonstrate the ability to analyze welding problems and to make decisions that use the most economical and practical welding process for the given task. This course concentrates on the advanced study of materials and methods, including joint work, adhering to specifications, fabrication of equipment, and completion of special projects.

WE 224A                           Advanced Welding Fabrication & Project
4 Credit Hours
This course is designed to give advanced practice in individual project development, layout, and fabrication. The course may be repeated for credit, but may only be counted once by degree-seeking students.
Prerequisite: WE 114 Introduction to Welding and WE 124 Advanced Welding

WE 243C                           Industrial Codes and Standards
3 Credit Hours
This course includes various codes and standards that are used in welding and fabrication. API is the standard for all pipe used by companies in the oil industry.  ASME coding includes the use of vessels, pressure, and structural needs for the power plants, nuclear plants, and water power dams.  AWS includes D-11, the standards for structural welding. Prerequisite: WE 114 Introduction to Welding

WE 244                              Welding Cooperative Work Experience
4 Credit Hours
The welding co-operative work experience is designed to offer an internship within the industry setting for welding. Students will work under the supervision of an approved professional / specialist in the welding field. A member of the New Mexico Junior College faculty will act as coordinator between and company, and will monitor the internship.  A minimum of 180 work hours on the job site is required for successful completion of the course during the semester or the work period.
Prerequisite:  WE 124 Advanced Welding and the consent of the instructor and the company.
 
Course Numbers:   Courses numbered from 100 to 199 are intended primarily for first‐year students (freshmen); 200 to 299 for second‐year students (sophomores).
Credit Hours:   The credit hours are indicated under the course title. Credit hours are measured in class hours and lab hours. In addition to class time, students should expect to spend about two to three hours of study and preparation for each credit hour of class.
Prerequisites & Corequisites:   Prerequisites are courses you must successfully complete before enrolling in a course. Exceptions can be made with the instructor’s approval. For college level courses, there is an assumption of college-level reading and writing skills. Corequisites are courses taken during the same semester.